The Alternative Low German Dictionary

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Colourful extracts from Wiktionary. Slang, vulgarities, profanities, slurs, interjections, colloquialisms and more.

Entries

drapen etymology Doublet of drepen. From gml drepen, from osx drepan, from Proto-Germanic *drepaną.
verb: {{head}}
  1. (transitive or reflexive) to meet; to encounter
  2. (transitive or intransitive) to hit; to strike
  3. (transitive) to affect; to concern
  4. (intransitive or reflexive, colloquial, often with “goot” or “slecht”) to hit the mark; to suit; to be convenient, fortunate exampleDat dröppt sick slecht.
drepen etymology From gml drepen, from osx drepan, from Proto-Germanic *drepaną. See also drapen.
verb: {{head}}
  1. (transitive or reflexive) to meet; to encounter
  2. (transitive or intransitive) to hit; to strike
  3. (transitive) to affect; to concern
  4. (intransitive or reflexive, colloquial, often with “goot” or “slecht”) to hit the mark; to suit; to be convenient, fortunate exampleDat drippt sick egentlig goot.
drieten etymology From osx drītan.
verb: {{head}}
  1. (vulgar, colloquial) to shit
drieven etymology From gml driven, from osx drīvan, from Proto-Germanic *drībaną, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰreybʰ-. Cognate with Dutch drijven, West Frisian driuwe, English drive, German treiben, Danish drive. More at drive.
verb: {{head}}
  1. (transitive, auxiliary: “hebben”) to drive (e.g. livestock); to propel; to force
  2. (transitive, auxiliary: “hebben”) to put forth; to produce; to sprout
  3. (transitive, figuratively, auxiliary: “hebben”) to urge
  4. (transitive, vulgar, slang, auxiliary: “hebben”) to fuck
  5. (intransitive, auxiliary: “wesen”) to drift; to float about
  6. (intransitive, auxiliary: “wesen”) to sprout
gahn etymology From osx gān, from Proto-Germanic *gāną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁- 〈*ǵʰeh₁-〉. Cognate with Dutch gaan, German gehen, English go, Western Frisian gean, Danish . pronunciation
  • /ɡɔːn/, ɡɒːn/
verb: {{head}} (past singular güng, past participle gahn or gangen, auxiliary verb wesen)
  1. (intransitive) to go
  2. (intransitive) to walk
  3. (transitive) to walk (some distance); to go (usually) by foot
  4. (intransitive) to leave Ik gah nu. – I'm leaving now.
  5. (intransitive) To lead (in a direction). Dehierste Weg geiht richt na Bassum. — This road goes all the way to Bassum.
  6. (intransitive) To proceed (well or poorly). Dat is goot gahn. — That went well.
  7. (impersonal, intransitive) to be going; to be alright; indicates how the oblique object fares Woans geiht dat di? — “How are you doing?” Mi geiht dat goot. — “I’m doing well.” (Literally, “It goes well for me.”) Dat geiht. — “It’s alright.”
  8. (auxiliary) Used to form the future tense of a verb, together with an infinitive. Dat geiht doch nich warken. — It will not work anyway. Note: schölen and wüllen are used more often for the future tense, instead of gahn.
  9. (auxiliary) To start to, begin to, to be going to De Sünn geiht wedder schienen. — The sun is starting to shine again. Ik gah slapen. — I'm going to sleep. Dat geiht so regen. — It's going to start raining soon.
  10. (colloquial, intransitive) to be possible Dat mag villicht gahn. – That might be possible.
  11. (colloquial, intransitive) to work, to function (the verb warken is also used in that context) De Koffeeautomaat geiht nich. – The coffee dispenser doesn't work.
  12. (colloquial, intransitive) to be in progress; to last De Sitten geiht bet Klock een. – The session is scheduled until one o'clock.
  13. (impersonal, intransitive, with “op” followed by a time) to approach; to be going (on some one) Dat geiht op Klock 8. — “It’s going on 8 o’clock.”
Unlike English to go, Low German gahn does not mean "to travel somewhere" in general. A distinction must be made between gahn (walk), fohren (go by bike, car, train, or ship), and flegen (go by plane). If used with a place one cannot or would not commonly walk to, gahn often imples that one intends to stay there for a long time, e.g.: Ik gah na New York. – I'm going to live in New York.
halen etymology From osx halōn, from Proto-Germanic *halōną. Compare Dutch halen, English hale.
verb: {{head}}
  1. to (go) get, to fetch to go somewhere and take something Ik haal noch en Stohl. I go get another chair.
  2. (colloquial, reflexive) to get in the sense of “to acquire, to buy” Ik haal mi morgen en ne'en Feernseher. I’m getting a new TV tomorrow.
nich etymology From gml nichit, nicht, nich, neyt, nüwet, a contracted form of osx neowiht, from neo + wiht, derived from Proto-Germanic *ne + *aiw- + *wiht-. Akin to German nicht, Dutch niet, West Frisian net, English not where similar developments took place. Alternative forms: ni (informal writing, reflecting the common pronunciation) pronunciation
  • /nɪç/, [nɪç] (official standard)
  • /nɪ/, [nɪ] (common speech)
adverb: {{head}}
  1. not exampleDo dat nich! Do not do it! exampleDat is nich wohr. That is not true.
interjection: {{head}}
  1. is it not? (a tag question)
rüken etymology From osx *rūkan, from Proto-Germanic *reukaną.
verb: {{head}}
  1. (transitive) to smell (something); to sniff (something)
  2. (intransitive) to use the sense of smell; to detect a smell an wat rüken — “to smell something”
  3. (intransitive) to reek; to smell bad
  4. (intransitive) to have a scent; to smell (some way) na wat rüken — “to smell like something”, “to smell of something”
  5. (transitive, slang) to tolerate (someone); to stand (someone) Ik kann em nich rüken. — “I cannot stand him.”
related terms:
  • Röök
  • Rüker
  • röken

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