The Alternative Latin Dictionary

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Colourful extracts from Wiktionary. Slang, vulgarities, profanities, slurs, interjections, colloquialisms and more.

Entries

anilis etymology From anus + īlis. pronunciation
  • (Classical) /aˈniː.lis/
adjective: {{la-adj-3rd-2E}}
  1. of or pertaining to an old woman
  2. (pejorative) old-womanish; anile
related terms:
  • anus
descendants:
  • English: anile
ardus Alternative forms: āridus (more common, original form) etymology Contracted from the synonymous term āridus originally from the verb āreo, akin to ārdeō. Confer the term arfacio which is contracted from the synonymous term ārefacio. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
adjective: {{la-adj-1&2}}
  1. dry, parched, withered, arid Montes aridi sterilesque. Parched and barren mountains. Arida ligna. Dry wood. Terra arida et sicca. An arid and dry ground.
  2. (of things) dry, lean, meagre, shrivelled; withered (e.g. from disease) Uvis aridior puella passis. A damsel drier than the raisin'd grape. Vita horrida atque arida. Rough and meagre life.
  3. (rhetorical style) uninspired, jejune, spiritless Aridi magistri. Uninspired teachers. Sicci omnino atque aridi pueri. Sapless lads, altogether, and dry.
  4. (slang) avaricious, someone greedy or stingy (confer the tongue-in-cheek term Argentiexterebronides)
aridus Alternative forms: ardus (less common) etymology From the verb āreo, akin to ārdeō. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
adjective: {{la-adj-1&2}}
  1. dry, parched, withered, arid Montes aridi sterilesque. Parched and barren mountains. Arida ligna. Dry wood. Terra arida et sicca. An arid and dry ground.
  2. (of things) dry, lean, meagre, shrivelled; withered (e.g. from disease) Uvis aridior puella passis. A damsel drier than the raisin'd grape. Vita horrida atque arida. Rough and meagre life.
  3. (rhetorical style) uninspired, jejune, spiritless Aridi magistri. Uninspired teachers. Sicci omnino atque aridi pueri. Sapless lads, altogether, and dry.
  4. (slang) avaricious, someone greedy or stingy (confer the tongue-in-cheek term Argentiexterebronides)
  • Sometimes used of thirst; and
  • Of a fever meaning to "cause thirst"; used with febris and morbus
  • Of color; .
  • Also used of cracking or snapping sound, as when dry wood is broken; and both refer to a a dry, grating, half-crackling sound, as in
descendants:
  • English: arid (borrowed)
  • French: aride
arrigo pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
verb: {{la-verb}}
  1. I raise, erect
  2. I encourage, animate, rouse, excite
  3. (vulgar) I have an erection
descendants:
  • Spanish: arrecir, arrigirse
Beelzebub Alternative forms: Beelzebul etymology Translating Ancient Greek Βεελζεβούλ 〈Beelzeboúl〉 and Hebrew בעל זבוב 〈bʻl zbwb〉; perhaps a corruption of Beelzebul, meaning Lord of the High Place, with -bul altered to -bub to change the meaning to Lord of the Flies.
proper noun: {{head}}
  1. A demon or devil.
  2. (biblical) the god of the Philistine city of Ekron.
  3. (pejorative) Beelzebul
bulga etymology From Gaulish bulgas, from Proto-Celtic *bolgos, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰolǵʰ-. Cognate with Old Irish bolg, Breton bolc'h.
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. knapsack
  2. wallet, purse
  3. (informal) womb
descendants:
  • Old French: boulge, bouge; bougette
    • French: bouge
    • English: bulge, budge
    • Middle English: bogett, bouget, bowgette
      • English: budget
caco etymology From a Proto-Indo-European root *kakka-. Compare Old Irish cacc, Ancient Greek κακκάω 〈kakkáō〉, Middle Armenian քաք 〈kʻakʻ〉, Russian ка́кать 〈kákatʹ〉. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
verb: {{la-verb}}
  1. (vulgar) I defecate, shit, pass excrement. culus tibi purior salillo est, nec toto decies cacas in anno (your anus is purer than a little salt-cellar, and you defecate no more than ten times in a whole year) — poem 23 (translation adapted by H. J. Walker)
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Aromanian: cac, cãcari
  • Catalan: cagar
  • Dalmatian: cacuor
  • Franco-Provençal: cacar
  • French: chier, caguer
  • Friulian: cjiâ, čhiâ
  • Galician: cagar
  • German: kacken
  • Italian: cacare
{{mid2}}
  • Occitan: cagar
  • Portuguese: cagar
  • Romanian: căca, căcare
  • Sardinian: cacare, cagai, cagare
  • Sicilian: cacari
  • Spanish: cagar
  • Swedish: kacka
  • Turkish: kaka
  • Venetian: cagar
{{bottom}}
caudex etymology Uncertain, but some have connected it to Proto-Indo-European *h₃osk- 〈*h₃osk-〉, the same source as Welsh onnen, Latin ornus, Lithuanian úosis, Russian я́сень 〈ấsenʹ〉, Albanian ah, Ancient Greek ὀξύα 〈oxýa〉, Old Armenian հացի 〈hacʻi〉. The connection stems from the assumption that Indo-Europeans used hollowed out ash trees as boats and skiffs.Schrader, Prehistoric antiquities of the Aryan peoples: a manual of comparative philology and the earliest culture pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
Alternative forms: cōdex
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. A tree trunk, stump.
  2. A bollard; post.
  3. A book, writing; notebook, account book.
  4. (pejorative) A bollard, blockhead, idiot.
cicer etymology From Proto-Indo-European *ḱiḱer- 〈*ḱiḱer-〉. Akin to Old Armenian սիսեռն 〈siseṙn〉, Ancient Macedonian κίκερροι 〈kíkerroi〉 and perhaps Ancient Greek κριός 〈kriós〉. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. chickpea
  2. (slang) testicle
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Albanian: qiqer, qiq
  • Dalmatian: cič
  • Italian: cece
{{mid2}}
  • Sardinian: cixiri
  • Sicilian: cìciru
  • Spanish: chícharo
{{bottom}}
cinaedus pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) sodomite, catamite a passive male sexual partner
adjective: {{la-adj-1&2}}
  1. unchaste; shameful; typical of a sodomite
cloaca etymology From cluō. pronunciation
  • (Classical) /kloˈaː.ka/
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. A sewer or underground drain
  2. (humorous) The stomach of a drunken or voracious woman
descendants: {{top2}}
  • English: cloaca
  • French: cloaque
  • Italian: cloaca, chiavica
{{mid2}}
  • Portuguese: cloaca
  • Romanian: cloacă
  • Spanish: cloaca
{{bottom}}
coleatus pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
adjective: {{la-adj-1&2}}
  1. (vulgar) provided with, having or pertaining to testicles
related terms:
  • cōleus
coleus Alternative forms: cūleus, culleus etymology {{rfe}} pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. sack bag for liquids or grains
  2. (in the plural, vulgar) scrotum, testicles
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Catalan: colló
  • English: coleus
  • French: couille
  • Italian: coglione
  • Portuguese: colhão
{{mid2}}
  • Romanian: coi
  • Spanish: cojudo, cojón
  • Venetian: cojon
{{bottom}}
conforio etymology con + foriō, from foria.
verb: {{head}} (present infinitive conforīre)http://www.dicolatin.com/FR/LAK/0/CONFORIRE/index.htm
  1. (vulgar) to defile, pollute with ordure, diarrhea Conforisti me, Diomedes
descendants:
  • Aromanian: cufurescu, cufuriri
  • Romanian: cufuri
confutuo etymology con- + futuō pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
verb: {{la-verb}}
  1. (vulgar) To have conjugal sexual intercourse, fuck conjugally
  2. (vulgar) To have sexual intercourse, fuck
    • quotationCatullus, Carmina, 37
related terms:
  • futuō
  • futūtor
criso Alternative forms: crissō etymology {{rfe}} pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
verb: {{la-verb}}
  1. (vulgar) I grind (rhythmically move the haunches during sex)
    • , Epigrammaton, 14:203: Tam tremulum crisat, tam blandum prurit, ut ipsum / Masturbatorem fecerit Hippolytum. So tremulously she shakes her behind, so alluringly she arouses, / that she would make Hippolytus himself a masturbator.
    • , Satire VI, 322: [...] / ipsa Medullinae fluctum crisantis adorat: / [...] [...] then she in turn worships Medullina's undulating surges [...]
  • Crīso is a word for the female action during receptive sex, as opposed to ceveo for males and futuo for the act of penetration.
crux {{wikipedia}} etymology From the Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker-.Pokorny 611 Possible cognate with Latin circus and curvus. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
  • {{audio}}
  • (Ecclesiastical) /ˈkruks/
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. wooden frame on which criminal were crucified, especially a cross
  2. (derogatory) gallows bird; one who deserve to be hanged
  3. (figuratively) torture; misery
related terms: {{top2}}
  • cruciābilis
  • cruciābiliter
  • cruciābilitās
  • cruciābundus
  • cruciāmen
{{mid2}}
  • cruciāmentum
  • cruciātiō
  • cruciātor
  • cruciātōrius
  • cruciātus
{{bottom}}
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Albanian: kryq
  • Aromanian: crutsi, crutse
  • Asturian: cruz
  • Catalan: creu
  • Czech: kříž
  • Dalmatian: crauc
  • English: crux, cross
  • Friulian: crôs
  • Galician: cruz
  • German: Kreuz
  • Italian: croce
  • Norman: crouaix
  • Occitan: crotz
  • Old French: crois
    • Middle French: croix
      • French: croix
{{mid2}}
  • Old Norse: kross
  • Old Portuguese: cruz
    • Portuguese: cruz
  • Romanian: cruce
  • Romansch: crusch, crousch
  • Sardinian: cruche, crugi, cruxi, gruche, grughe, gruxi
  • Serbo-Croatian: krȋž / scCyrl
  • Slovak: kríž
  • Spanish: cruz
  • Venetian: cróxe
  • Walloon: croes
{{bottom}}
culus etymology From Proto-Indo-European *kuH-l-, zero-grade without s-mobile form of *(s)kewH-. Cognates include Old Irish cúl, Lithuanian kẽvalas 〈kẽvalas〉 and indirectly Old English hȳd (English hide). Related to obscūrus and cutis. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) The anus, arse; the posterior, buttocks
    • quotationCatullus, Carmina, 97
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Aromanian: cur
  • Asturian: culu
  • Catalan: cul
  • Corsican: culu
  • Dalmatian: čol
  • French: cul, culotte
  • Friulian: cûl
  • Galician: cu
  • Ido: kulo
  • Istro-Romanian: cur
{{mid2}}
  • Italian: culo
  • Megleno-Romanian: cur
  • Occitan: cuol
  • Portuguese: cu
  • Romanian: cur
  • Romansch: tgil, tgigl, chül
  • Sardinian: colu, cu, culu
  • Sicilian: culu
  • Spanish: culo
  • Vegliot: čol
{{bottom}}
cunnilingus pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) cuntlicker, cunnilinguist
cunnus etymology Uncertain. Various theories include:
  • Proto-Indo-European *gʷḗn 〈*gʷḗn〉, whence it would be cognate with Mycenaean Greek 𐀓𐀙𐀊 〈𐀓𐀙𐀊〉, Old English cwene, Proto-Slavic *žena, Sanskrit जनि 〈jani〉;
  • Proto-Indo-European *kut-nos, cognate with cutis. The metaphor is identical to the one connecting Latin vulva and English hull, albeit from a different IE root.
  • Other theoretic relation is to Latin cuneus.
pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. woman
    • Horatius, Sermones, I, 3 , “nam fuit ante Helenam cunnus taeterrima belli<br>causa, sed ignotis perierunt mortibus illi,<br>quos venerem incertam rapientis more ferarum<br>viribus editior caedebat ut in grege taurus.”, 40/41 CE
  2. (vulgar) cunt, cunny (obscene word for the vulva)
  3. (vulgar) female pudendum, pubic hair
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Asturian: coñu
  • Catalan: cony
  • Dalmatian: con
  • Galician: cona
  • French: con
  • Hungarian: cuni, cunci (borrowed)
{{mid2}}
  • Italian: conno
  • Neapolitan: cunnu
  • Portuguese: cona
  • Sicilian: cunnu
  • Spanish: coño
{{bottom}}
defaeco etymology de + faex pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
verb: {{la-verb}}
  1. I defecate (all senses)
descendants:
  • English: defecate
defututus etymology dē- + futūtus, perfect passive participle of futuere, fuck. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
adjective: {{la-adj-1&2}}
  1. (vulgar) exhausted, worn (from sexual intercourse)
    • , , 41 Ameana puella defututa tota milia me decem poposcit
related terms:
  • diffutūtus
  • exfutūtus
  • futuō
denuo etymology Contracted from dē novo. Confer French de nouveau.[http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0059%3Aentry%3Dde_nu^o_ Perseus project]
adverb: {{la-adv}}
  1. anew, afresh, again
    • quotationJerome, Vulgate, Ioannes, 3, 7
  2. a second time, once again, once more, again
  3. anything which is repeated, once more, again
    • quotationPlautus, Amphitryon, 2, 95
    • quotationPlautus, Menaechmi
  4. (colloquial) again, where an action is reversed
Synonyms: (again, anew) ab integro, (a second time) iterum, (anything that is repeated) rursus
dictatrix etymology From dictātor, from dictō, from dīcō. pronunciation
  • (Classical) /dikˈtaː.triːks/
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (humorous) woman in charge
    • c.205-184 {{B.C.E.}}, Persa, act v, scene 1 Do hanc tibi florentem florenti: tuhic eris dictatrix nobis.
related terms: {{top2}}
  • dīcō
  • dictāmen
  • dictātiō
  • dictātor
  • dictātōrius
{{mid2}}
  • dictātūra
  • dictō
  • dictum
  • dictus
{{bottom}}
diffututus etymology dis- + futūtus, perfect passive participle of futuō. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
adjective: {{la-adj-1&2}}
  1. (vulgar) exhausted (from indulgence in sexual intercourse), shagged out
    • , , 29 ut ista vestra diffututa mentula ducenties comesset aut trecenties?
related terms:
  • dēfutūtus
  • exfutūtus
  • futuere
draucus
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) sodomite
fello etymology From Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁(y)- 〈*dʰeh₁(y)-〉. Cognates include Sanskrit धयति 〈dhayati〉, Ancient Greek θηλή 〈thēlḗ〉 and Old Church Slavonic доити 〈doiti〉. Related to fēmina, fīlius, fētus. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
verb: {{la-verb}}
  1. I suck.
  2. (vulgar) In particular, I fellate.
quotations:
  • 1st century AD, , Epigrams 2.50 Quod fellas et aquam potas, nil, Lesbia, peccas: qua tibi parte opus est, Lesbia, sumis aquam. (Because you suck [cock] and drink water, Lesbia, you err in nothing: in just the part you ought to be, Lesbia, you're making use of the water)
descendants:
  • English: fellate
flexibilis etymology From flectō + ibilis. pronunciation
  • (Classical) /flekˈsi.bi.lis/
adjective: {{la-adj-3rd-2E}}
  1. flexible, pliant, able to be bent
  2. (of persons) tractable, pliant
  3. (of persons, pejorative) fickle, wavering, inconstant
  4. (grammar) inflectable
Synonyms: (flexible) flexilis
antonyms:
  • (grammar) inflexibilis
related terms: {{rel3}}
descendants:
  • English: flexible
  • Italian: flessibile
frutex
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. shrub, bush
  2. trunk (of a tree)
  3. (informal) blockhead
futuo etymology vl, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew-. Related to fūstis. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
verb: {{la-verb}}
  1. (vulgar) I fuck, I have vaginal sex
    • , Epigrammata, 11:10 "Aut futue, aut pugnemus" ait. "Either fuck me or let's fight" she says.
    • , Latin for All Occassions (1990), ISBN 0394586603 Futue te ipsum et caballum tuum. Fuck you and the horse you rode in on.
  • Futuō is used in the sense of penetrating, not of being penetrated.
related terms: {{rel-top}}
  • confutuo
  • defututus
  • diffututus
  • exfututus
{{rel-mid}}
  • fututor
  • fututrix
  • fututio
{{rel-bottom}}
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Aromanian: fut, futiri
  • Catalan: fotre
  • French: foutre
  • Friulian: foti
  • Galician: foder
  • Italian: fottere
  • Occitan: fóter, fotre
{{mid2}}
  • Portuguese: foder, futre (via French)
  • Romanian: fute, futere
  • Sardinian: fútere, futíre, futíri
  • Sicilian: fùttiri
  • Spanish: joder
  • Venetian: fotar
{{bottom}}
fututio etymology Noun formed from futūtum, supine of futuō + -iō, ending indicating an action pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) sexual intercourse, fuck, fucking
    • quotationCatullus, Carmina, 32
  2. inflection of futūtiō
  1. quotationMartial, Epigrams, 106
related terms:
  • futūtor
  • futūtrix
  • futuō
fututor etymology Agent noun formed from futūtum, supine of futuō + -or, agential ending pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) male who has sexual intercourse, fucker
    • 86 - 103 {{C.E.}} — , Epigrammata 1:73 Sed nunc positis custodibus ingens turba fututorum est: ingeniosus homo es. But now that you have positioned guards, there is a huge crowd of fuckers: you are an ingenious man.
  2. inflection of futūtor
related terms:
  • futūtiō
  • futūtrix
  • futuō
idiota Alternative forms: idiōtēs etymology From Ancient Greek ἰδιώτης 〈idiṓtēs〉, from ἴδιος 〈ídios〉. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (pejorative) idiot
irrumator Alternative forms: inrumator etymology From irrumare, to force receptive male oral sex + -or Seen in Catullus 10, used to describe a praetor. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (slang) bastard, asshole, cocksucker
landica pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (vulgar slang) clitoris
  2. gridiron
  3. censer
descendants:
  • Old French: landie
  • Romanian: lindic
lena etymology Feminization of lēnō. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (slang) procuress, madame
  2. inflection of lēna
lēnā {{g}}
  1. inflection of lēna
lupa etymology From lupus. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. she-wolf
  2. (slang) prostitute
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Asturian: lloba
  • Catalan: lloba
  • French: louve
  • Italian: lupa
  • Neapolitan: lopa
{{mid2}}
  • Occitan: loba
  • Portuguese: loba
  • Sicilian: lupa
  • Spanish: loba
{{bottom}}
magnissimus
adjective: {{head}}
  1. (informal) superlative of magnus
The expected and usual superlative of magnus is maximus, but this alternative was used by the Latin grammarian Virgilius Maro.
mentula {{wikipedia}} etymology Probably a diminutive of mens or menta. Other sources see it as coming ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *men-, cognate with emineō and mōns. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) dick, cock obscene word for the penis
    • , , 29 ut ista vestra diffututa mentula ducenties comesset aut trecenties?
  2. inflection of mentula
mentulā
  1. inflection of mentula
Synonyms: penis, verpa
related terms:
  • mentulātus
descendants:
  • French: mentule
  • Italian: minchia
  • Sicilian: minchia
merda etymology Uncertain. Probably related to Proto-Slavic *smordъ 〈*smordʺ〉 (Czech, Slovene, Croatian smrad, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian смрад 〈smrad〉, Polish smród). pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (slang, vulgar) dung, excrement, shit
    • Ut merdas edatis, qui scripseras sopionis - Anonymous graffito in Pompeii
    • You who have drawn pictures of penises, eat shit!
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Asturian: mierda
  • Catalan: merda
  • Corsican: merda
  • Dalmatian: miarda
  • French: merde
  • Friulian: mierde
  • Galician: merda
  • Istriot: mierda
  • Italian: merda
{{mid2}}
  • Occitan: mèrda
  • Portuguese: merda
  • Romanian dezmierda
  • Romansch: merda, miarda
  • Sardinian: merda, melda
  • Sicilian: merda
  • Spanish: mierda
  • Venetian: merda
  • Walloon: miere
{{bottom}}
meretrix etymology From mereō + trīx. Literally "she who earns". pronunciation
  • (Classical) /ˈme.re.triːks/
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (slang) courtesan, prostitute, harlot
related terms: {{top2}}
  • merenda
  • merendārius
  • merendō
  • merēns
  • mereō
{{mid2}}
  • meritō
  • meritōrium
  • meritōrius
  • meritum
  • meritus
{{bottom}}
descendants:
  • Italian: meretrice
  • Old English: myltestre
  • Portuguese: meretriz
moecha pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (slang) an adulteress, a slut, a whore
related terms:
  • moechor
  • moechus
muliebris etymology From mulier. pronunciation
  • (Classical) /mu.liˈe.bris/
adjective: {{la-adj-3rd-2E}}
  1. of a woman, womanly, feminine, female
  2. (pejorative) effeminate, womanish, unmanly
Synonyms: (feminine) fēminīnus
antonyms:
  • (feminine) masculīnus, masculus
related terms: {{top2}}
  • mulier
  • muliebrōsus
  • mulierārius
  • muliercula
  • mulierculārius
{{mid2}}
  • mulieritās
  • mulierō
  • mulierōsitās
  • mulierōsus
{{bottom}}
descendants:
  • Italian: muliebre
mulus etymology Probably from a pre-Latin Mediterranean language, likely cognate with μυχλός 〈mychlós〉, μύκλος 〈mýklos〉, μύκλα 〈mýkla〉. pronunciation
  • (Classical) /ˈmuː.lus/
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. a mule (pack animal)
  2. (pejorative) ass, idiot
Synonyms: (ass, idiot) asinus
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Albanian: mulë
  • Aragonese: mula
  • Catalan: mul
  • English: mule
  • Esperanto: mulo
  • French: mule
  • Galician: mula
{{mid2}}
  • Italian: mulo
  • Occitan: mul
  • Portuguese: mula
  • Romanian: mul
  • Russian: мул 〈mul〉
  • Sicilian: mulu
  • Spanish: mulo
{{bottom}}
podex pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) anus, rectum
    • quotationHorace, Epodes, 8
    • 1990, , Latin for All Occassions, ISBN 0394586603: Podex perfectus es. You are a total asshole.
  2. fundament
porcus {{wikipedia}} etymology From Proto-Italic *porkos, from Proto-Indo-European *pórḱos 〈*pórḱos〉. Cognate with Old English fearh. More at farrow. Compare also Ancient Greek πόρκος 〈pórkos〉. pronunciation
  • (Classical) /ˈpor.kus/
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. a pig, hog, a tame swine
  2. (pejorative) glutton, pig
  3. porcus marīnus, the sea-hog, porpoise
  4. pudenda muliebria, woman parts (cf. the same Greek use of χοῖρος 〈choîros〉)
  5. (military) a wedge-shaped battle formation
Synonyms: (battle formation) caput porcī
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Aromanian: porcu
  • Asturian: puercu
  • Catalan: porc
  • Corsican: porcu
  • Dalmatian: puarc
  • English: pork
  • Esperanto: porko
  • Fala: porcu
  • Friulian: purcit
  • Galician: porco
  • Ido: porko
  • Interlingua: porco
  • Italian: porco
  • Ligurian: pòrco
{{mid2}}
  • Occitan: pòrc
  • Old French: porc
    • French: porc
  • Old Portuguese: porco
    • Portuguese: porco
      • Guaraní: poryko
      • Kaingang: porko
  • Romanian: porc
  • Romansch: portg
  • Sardinian: porcu
  • Sicilian: porcu
  • Spanish: puerco
  • Venetian: porco
{{bottom}}
anagrams:
  • corpus
prosa Alternative forms: prorsa etymology A colloquial form of prorsa the feminine form of prorsus, from Old Latin prōvorsus, from pro- + vorsus, form of vertō. Compare verse.{{R:Online Etymology Dictionary}}
noun: prōsa
  1. (colloquial) feminine form of prōsus
rhetor etymology From Ancient Greek ῥήτωρ 〈rhḗtōr〉 pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. teacher of rhetoric.
  2. (derogatory) orator, rhetorician.
related terms:
  • rhētorica
  • rhētoricē
  • rhētoricor
  • rhētoricus
  • rhētorissō
descendants:
  • French: rhéteur
  • Spanish: retórico
simia Alternative forms: sīmius etymology From Ancient Greek σιμός 〈simós〉. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. an ape, monkey
    • Attributed to by in De natura deorum, Book I, Chapter XXXV Simia quam similis turpissima bestia nobis! The ape, most vile beast, how similar to us!
  2. (pejorative, of a person) monkey
  3. an imitator
Occasionally used as a masculine noun, especially the pejorative sense.
descendants:
  • Catalan: ximia
  • English: simian
  • Italian: scimmia
  • Romansch: schimgia, schemia, schemgia, schiemgia
  • Spanish: jimia
verpa {{wikipedia}} etymology Possibly borrowed from a gem language, from Proto-Germanic *werpaną. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) a penis, a dick
Synonyms: (a penis) mentula, penis
related terms:
  • verpus
verpus etymology From verpa. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
adjective: {{la-adj-1&2}}
  1. (vulgar, of a penis) erect
  2. (of a person or a penis) circumcised
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. A circumcised person, a Jew
    • Quaesitum ad fontem solos deducere verpos - Juvenal
    • To guide only the circumcised [i.e. Jews] to the fountain that they seek.
vervex Alternative forms: berbēx, verbēx pronunciation
  • (Classical) /ˈwer.weːks/
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. a wether; a castrate ram
  2. (pejorative) blockhead, dolt
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Aromanian: birbec
  • French: brebis
  • Italian: berbice
  • Norman: brébis
{{mid2}}
  • Occitan: berbitz
  • Romanian: berbec
  • Romansh: barbeisch
{{bottom}}
virga etymology Probably from Proto-Indo-European *wisgā. Possibly cognate to Old Norse visk and Old High German wisc.{{R:Nocentini|hw=verga}} pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
pronunciation 1: {{rfc-pron-n}}
  • (Classical) /ˈwir.ɡa/
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. twig, switch
  2. rod, switch for flog.
  3. staff, walking stick
  4. wand (magical)
  5. (figuratively, vulgar) penis
{{head}}
  1. inflection of virga
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Aromanian: veargã
  • English: virga
  • French: verge
  • Greek: βέργα 〈bérga〉
  • Hungarian: virgács
{{mid2}}
  • Istriot: virga
  • Italian: verga
  • Portuguese: verga, virga
  • Romanian: vargă
  • Spanish: verga
{{bottom}}
pronunciation 2:
  • (Classical) /ˈwir.ɡaː/
noun: {{head}}
  1. inflection of virga
volgaritas
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. alternative form of vulgaritas
volgariter
adverb: {{la-adv}}
  1. alternative form of vulgariter
vomer etymology Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ-. pronunciation
  • {{la-pronunc}}
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. ploughshare
  2. (informal) penis
descendants:
  • Aromanian: vomirã
  • English: vomer
  • French: vomer
  • Italian: vomere
voro etymology From Proto-Indo-European *gʷerh₃- 〈*gʷerh₃-〉. Cognates include Ancient Greek βιβρώσκω 〈bibrṓskō〉 and Sanskrit गिरति 〈girati〉. pronunciation
  • (Classical) /ˈwo.roː/
verb: {{la-verb}}
  1. I devour; I eat greedily.
  2. I swallow up.
  3. (figuratively) I destroy, overwhelm.
  4. (figuratively) I read eagerly.
  5. (vulgar) I fellate
Synonyms: (devour) sumō, (fellate) fellō
related terms: {{rel3}}
vulgarant
verb: {{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
vulgaras
verb: {{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
vulgarat
verb: {{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
vulgaratis
verb: {{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
vulgarim
verb: {{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
vulgarimus
verb: {{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
{{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
vulgarint
verb: {{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
  2. inflection of vulgō
vulgaris etymology From vulgus + āris. pronunciation
  • (Classical) /wulˈɡaː.ris/
  • {{audio}}
adjective: {{la-adj-3rd-2E}}
  1. common, usual, commonly known
  2. simple, plain
related terms: {{top2}}
  • vulgāritās
  • vulgāriter
  • vulgārius
  • vulgātē
  • vulgātor
{{mid2}}
  • vulgātus
  • vulgivagus
  • vulgō
  • vulgus
{{bottom}}
descendants: {{top2}}
  • Catalan: vulgar
  • Danish: vulgær
  • Dutch: vulgair
  • English: vulgar
  • French: vulgaire
  • Galician: vulgar
  • German: vulgär
{{mid2}}
  • Italian: volgare
  • Norman: vuldgaithe
  • Portuguese: vulgar
  • Romanian: vulgar
  • Spanish: vulgar
  • Swedish: vulgär
{{bottom}}
vulgarissimus
adjective: {{la-adj-superlative}}
  1. most or very common or usual
vulgarit
verb: {{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
  2. inflection of vulgō
vulgaritas
noun: {{la-noun}}
  1. multitude (great mass of common people)
vulgariter etymology From vulgāris + iter. pronunciation
  • (Classical) /wulˈɡaː.ri.ter/
noun: {{la-adv}}
  1. commonly, vulgarly, after the ordinary manner
related terms: {{top2}}
  • vulgāris
  • vulgāritās
  • vulgārius
  • vulgātē
  • vulgātor
{{mid2}}
  • vulgātus
  • vulgivagus
  • vulgō
  • vulgus
{{bottom}}
vulgaritis
verb: {{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
{{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
vulgaro
verb: {{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
vulgarunt
verb: {{la-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of vulgō
vulgo etymology From vulgus. pronunciation
  • (Classical) /ˈwul.ɡoː/
verb: {{la-verb}}
  1. I broadcast, publish, divulge, issue, make known among the people.
  2. I make common, prostitute.
  3. I cheapen, degrade.
related terms: {{top2}}
  • vulgāris
  • vulgāritās
  • vulgāriter
{{mid2}}
  • vulgārius
  • vulgivagus
  • vulgus
{{bottom}}
adverb: {{la-adv}}
  1. generally, usually
  2. universally
  3. publicly, commonly, popularly

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