The Alternative Irish Dictionary

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Colourful extracts from Wiktionary. Slang, vulgarities, profanities, slurs, interjections, colloquialisms and more.

Entries

ag
etymology 1 From Old Irish oc. Akin to agus. Compare Scottish Gaelic aig. pronunciation
  • (particle)
    • [ə] before a consonant
    • [əɡ], [əɟ] before a vowel
  • (preposition) [ɛɟ]
particle: {{head}}
  1. particle used with the verbal noun to make a progressive aspect: exampleag siúl walking exampleag gáire laughing exampleag ithe eating exampleag ól drinking
preposition: {{ga-prep}}
  1. at
  2. of, for {{i}} exampleBhí sé go deas ag Cáit a dhul leat. It was nice of Cáit to go with you. exampleTá sé éasca agat sin a rá. It’s easy for you to say that.
  3. of {{i}} exampleTá go leor acu anseo. There are plenty of them here. exampleTá duine againn tinn. One of us is ill.
  4. of {{i}} examplean teach seo againne this house of ours examplena bróga sin agatsa those shoes of yours
  5. used with forms of to indicate possession in place of a verb meaning ‘have’ exampleTá teach ag Seán. Seán has a house.
  6. used with forms of and a past participle to indicate a perfect tense exampleTá an teach péinteáilte ag Seán. Seán has painted the house.
  7. {{n-g}} exampleTá Spáinnis agam. I can speak Spanish. exampleTá caint agam. I can talk. exampleTá ceol agam. I can make music.
etymology 2 Reduced form of chuig, assimilated in all forms to Etymology 1. pronunciation
  • (preposition) /ɛɟ/
preposition: {{ga-prep}}
  1. (colloquial) alternative form of chuig exampleTá mé ag dul ag an dochtúr. I’m going to the doctor
amadán etymology From amaid + án, or from Old Irish ammatán. pronunciation
  • (Munster) [ɑmˠəˈd̪ˠɑːnˠ]
  • (Connacht) [ˈamˠəd̪ˠɑːnˠ]
  • (Ulster) [ˈamˠəd̪ˠænˠ]
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (pejorative) fool
descendants:
  • English: amadan
mutation: {{ga mut vowel}}
amaid etymology From Old Irish ammait, aimmit.
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (pejorative) fool
mutation: {{ga mut vowel}}
aon duine Alternative forms: aoinne, éinne pronunciation
  • (careful speech) /eːn̪ˠˈd̪ˠɪnʲə/
  • (colloquial speech) /eːˈn̪ˠɪnʲə/
  • (rapid speech) /ˈeːn̠ʲə/ {{i}}
pronoun: {{head}}
  1. anyone {{i}}
  2. no one {{i}}
mutation: {{ga mut vowel}}
beoir {{wikipedia}} etymology From Old Irish beóir, from Old Norse bjórr. pronunciation
  • [bʲoːɾʲ]
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. beer
  2. (colloquial, rare) A woman
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
bitseach
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, offensive) bitch
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
cac pronunciation
  • (Munster) /kɑk/
  • (Connemara) /kak/
etymology 1 From Old Irish cacc.
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. faeces, excrement
  2. (vulgar) shit
  3. (mining) raw ore
  4. verbal noun of cac
interjection: {{head}}
  1. (vulgar) Shit!, Fuck!
etymology 2 From Old Irish caccaid, from cacc.
verb: {{ga-verb}}
  1. excrete, defecate
  2. (vulgar) shit
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
cleas pronunciation
  • [clʲasˠ]
etymology 1 From Old Irish cles.
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. trick
  2. feat
  3. knack
  4. act
etymology 2
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (pejorative) class (of persons), gang
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
cnagaire etymology cnag + aire pronunciation
  • (Munster) /ˈknˠaɡəɾʲə/
  • (Cois Fharraige) /ˈkɾˠaɡəɾʲə/
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. woodpecker
  2. (slang) noggin
Synonyms: (woodpecker) snag darach, (noggin) gogán, naigín
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
daid etymology From English dad. pronunciation
  • [ˈd̪ˠadʲ]
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (informal) dad
Synonyms: daidí, deaide
mutation: {{ga mut cons}} {{catlangcode}}
daidí etymology From English daddy. pronunciation
  • [ˈd̪ˠadʲiː]
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (informal, often, childish) daddy
Synonyms: daid, deaide
mutation: {{ga mut cons}} {{catlangcode}}
deaide etymology From English dad and/or daddy. pronunciation
  • (Cois Fharraige) [ˈdʲæːdʲə]
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (informal) dad, daddy
Synonyms: daid, daidí, deaidí
mutation: {{ga mut cons}} {{catlangcode}}
dhuit Alternative forms: duit (standard) pronunciation
  • /ɣɪtʲ/
pronoun: {{head}}
  1. (colloquial) form of inflected second-person singular to/for you (sg)
  • This spelling is common and it accepted in Standard Irish, although the form duit is preferred.
duit Alternative forms: dhuit (colloquial) pronunciation
  • /d̪ˠɪtʲ/
  • (colloquial) /ɣɪtʲ/
pronoun: {{head}}
  1. inflection of do: to/for you (singular)
  • This spelling is standard. However, in dialects where this is pronounced /ɣɪtʲ/, it may be spelled dhuit.
féar etymology From Old Irish fér, from Proto-Celtic *wegro-. pronunciation
  • [fʲeːɾˠ]
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. grass
  2. (slang) marijuana
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
fiaile
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. weed
  2. (slang) marijuana
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
fíor
etymology 1 From Old Irish fír, from Proto-Indo-European *wēr-.
adjective: {{head}}
  1. true
  2. correct
  3. real
Synonyms: ceart, direach
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. truth
  2. honour
  3. (colloquial) word
etymology 2 From Old Irish figor, from Latin figūra. Alternative forms: fíoghar (obsolete)
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. form
  2. image
  3. shape
  4. appearance
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
gall pronunciation
  • (Cois Fharraige) /ɡɑːl̪ˠ/
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. foreigner
  2. (pejorative) Anglified Irish person
related terms:
  • Gall
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
leanbaí etymology From Old Irish lenbaide < lenab.
adjective: {{head}}
  1. childlike, innocent
  2. childish, infantile
  3. puerile
  4. doting
Synonyms: (childlike, infantile) naíonda
marachuan
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (slang) marijuana
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
meirdreach etymology {{rfe}}
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. prostitute
  2. (vulgar, pejorative) whore
Synonyms: striapach
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
milseog etymology milis + óg pronunciation
  • (Munster) [mʲɪl̠ʲˈʃoːɡ]
  • (Connacht) [ˈmʲɪl̠ʲʃoːɡ]
  • (Ulster) [ˈmʲɪl̠ʲʃɔɡ], [ˈmʲɪl̠ʲʃaɡ]
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. A dessert
  2. dessert course
  3. (colloquial) sweetheart, darling
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
óinseach pronunciation
  • [ˈoːn̠ʲʃəx]
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (pejorative) foolish woman
mutation: {{ga mut vowel}}
piteog etymology pit + óg pronunciation
  • (Munster) [pʲɪˈtʲoːɡ]
  • (Connacht) [ˈpʲɪtʲoːɡ]
  • (Ulster) [ˈpʲɪtʲɔɡ], [ˈpʲɪtʲaɡ]
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (pejorative) effeminate man, sissy exampleIs piteog é. He is a sissy./He is “girly”.
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
pleidhc pronunciation [ˈpləik]
noun: {{head}}
  1. (pejorative) fool
Synonyms: amadán
pleidhce etymology {{rfe}}
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (pejorative) simpleton, fool
Synonyms: (fool) amadán
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. flake; fleecy tuft
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
raithneach etymology From Old Irish raithnech (compare Scottish Gaelic raineach, Manx rhennagh).
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (collective) fern, bracken
  2. (slang) cannabis
saothraigh pronunciation
  • (Cois Fharraige) /ˈsˠiːɾˠə/
etymology 1 saothar + igh
verb: {{ga-verb}}
  1. labor, toil
  2. work, till, cultivate
  3. bring into cultivation, reclaim
  4. cultivate, develop
  5. (biology) culture
  6. (colloquial) earn
  7. work one's way
  8. work in, maneuver
etymology 2
adjective: {{head}}
  1. inflection of saothrach
  2. inflection of saothrach
  3. (archaic) inflection of saothrach
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
seonín etymology Seon + ín
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. (pejorative) shoneen (one who prefers English attitudes, customs or lifestyle to Irish ones)
mutation: {{ga mut cons}}
striapach etymology {{rfe}}
noun: {{ga-noun}}
  1. prostitute
  2. (vulgar, pejorative) whore
Synonyms: meirdreach

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