The Alternative English Dictionary

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Colourful extracts from Wiktionary. Slang, vulgarities, profanities, slurs, interjections, colloquialisms and more.

Entries

cock cheese Alternative forms: cock-cheese etymology The consistency of the curds of smegma have an appearance similar to some cheeses such as feta cheese
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, slang, idiomatic) smegma or dried semen on the glans penis usually underneath the foreskin
    • 2006, John Patrick, Lover Boys, page 178 Holding his stiff prick by the base with pre-cum oozing out of it, I swabbed the drool off the rosy bullet-shaped head, tasting the cock cheese.
Synonyms: dickcheese
cocked
adjective: {{head}}
  1. (informal) drunk He is totally cocked right now, about thirteen beers into his 12-pack.
verb: {{head}}
  1. en-past of cock
cocker
etymology 1 From cock and its derivative cocking
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (dated) One who breed gamecock or arrange cockfight.
  2. (dated) One who hunt gamecock.
    1. (colloquial) A cocker spaniel, either of two breed of dog originally bred for hunting gamecock.
etymology 2 From Middle English coker "a quiver, boot" from Old English cocer "quiver, case" from Proto-Germanic *kukur-. More at quiver.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A rustic high shoe, half-boots
etymology 3 Origin uncertain. Perhaps Old English cokeren; compare Welsh cocru, French coqueliner, and English cockle and cock.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (UK, informal) Friend, mate.
    • {{quote-book }}
    • {{quote-book }}
Synonyms: See
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. To make a nestle-cock of; to indulge or pamper (particularly of children) 1611, King James Bible, Ecclesiasticus, xxx. 9 Cocker thy child, and he ſhall make thee afraid: play with him and he will bring thee to heauinesse.
    • J. Ingelow Poor folks cannot afford to cocker themselves up.
cockeyed Alternative forms: cock-eyed (esp. UK)
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. (US) Having both eye oriented inward.
  2. (US) Crooked or askew.
  3. (US, informal) Absurd, silly, or stupid; usually used in reference to ideas rather than people. I'm not going to go along with your cockeyed plot.
  4. Drunk.
Synonyms: See also
cockface
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) a contemptible person
cockfag etymology cock + fag
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (neologism, vulgar, offensive) An extremely contemptible person.
cockfucker etymology From cock + fucker.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (slang, derogatory, offensive, vulgar) Term of abuse.
cock gobbler
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, slang, pejorative) someone who gives blowjob
cockhead etymology cock + head
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, slang) The glans penis.
    • Matt Bernstein Sycamore, Pulling Taffy (2003) p. 64: He says oh that feels great, could you squeeze a bit harder on my cockhead?
  2. (vulgar, slang, derogatory) Dickhead, a term of abuse.
    • Jerzy N. Kosinski, The Devil Tree: A Novel (2003) p. 89: I'm star material, you cockhead. Just look at me!
  3. (engineering) The rounded or pointed top of a grind mill spindle, forming a pivot on which the stone is balance.
related terms:
  • cockeye
cocking etymology From cock + -ing (forming participles)
verb: {{head}}
  1. present participle of cock
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (archaic) The hunting of gamecock.
  2. (obsolete) Cockfighting.
    • 1792, The European Magazine, and London Review (volume 21, page 313) Thus circumstanced, he became the avowed companion of sharpers and gamblers, attended cockings and races …
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. (vulgar) offensive or worthless
    • 2000, Neil Kurtzman, Doing Nothing (page 180) "Son of a cocking bastard."
cocking of a snook
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (UK, pejorative, as a gesture) A disrespectful gesture; a snook.
Synonyms: thumb one's nose, five-fingered salute
related terms:
  • cock a snook
cock juice
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, slang) semen, precum, and Cowper's fluid
cocklicker etymology cock + licker
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) a contemptible person
cockmaster
etymology 1 From cock + master.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. One who breeds gamecock.
etymology 2 Apparently from cock + master.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, slang) Used as a term of abuse. {{rfquote-sense}}
cockmunch
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, slang) An idiot or other undesirable person.
cockmuncher etymology cock + muncher
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, slang) An idiot or other undesirable person.
Cockney {{wikipedia}} Alternative forms: cockney etymology First attested in Samuel Rowland's 1600 The Letting of Humours Blood in the Head-Vaine as "a Bowe-bell Cockney", from Middle English cokenay, used in the 16th c. by English country folk as a term of disparagement for city dwellers, of uncertain etymology. Possibly from Middle English cokeney, from coken + ey or from Cockney and Cocknay, variants of Cockaigne, a mythical land of luxury (first attested in 1305) eventually used as a humorous epithet of London. Compare cocker. pronunciation
  • (UK) /ˈkɒk.ni/
  • {{rhymes}}
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. From the East End of London, or London generally
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (UK, slang) Any Londoner.
    • 1859, J.C. Hotten, A Dictionary of Modern Slang, Cant and Vulgar Words, 22 COCKNEY, a native of London. An ancient nickname implying effeminacy, used by the oldest English writers, and derived from the imaginary fool's paradise, or lubberland, Cockaygne.
  2. (UK ) A Londoner born within earshot of the city's Bow Bells, or (now, generically) any working-class Londoner.
    • 1617, Fynes Moryson, An Itinerary Londoners, and all within the sound of Bow Bell, are in reproach called Cockneys.
    • 1617, John Minsheu, Ductor in Linguas A Cockney or Cocksie, applied only to one born within the sound of Bow bell, that is in the City of London.
proper noun: {{en-proper noun}}
  1. The dialect or accent of such Londoner.
cock pilot
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, slang, idiomatic) Someone that is very preoccupied with penises and being sexually penetrated, particularly a gay male bottom Dean is a total cock pilot: he just loves sucking dick.
cock pump
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (informal) A penis pump.
    • {{seeCites}}
cock ring {{wikipedia}} Alternative forms: cockring
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. a band worn around the base of the penis to slow down the flow of blood into the penile tissue.
anagrams:
  • crocking
cockroach {{wikipedia}} etymology From Spanish cucaracha, from cuca, of onomatopoeic origin; see also Greek κόκκυξ 〈kókkyx〉 and Late Latin cucus. Influenced, via folk etymology, by cock and roach. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A black or brown straight-winged insect of the order Blattodea.
  2. (offensive, slang) An unhygienic person or a member of a group of people regarded as unhygienic or rapidly procreating.
  3. (offensive, slang, ethnic slur, Rwanda) A Tutsi.
Synonyms: (black or brown insect) roach (US)
cockroachy etymology cockroach + y
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. (informal) Infested with cockroach.
    • 1917, O. Henry, Waifs and Strays (page 55) Look at me, another accessory, come two thousand miles on a garlicky, cockroachy banana steamer all the way from South America to connive at the sacrifice...
    • 1992, Sue Grafton, H is for Homicide (page 227) By morning, the place seemed familiar in a cockroachy sort of way. Bibianna lent me a clean T-shirt to wear with my red miniskirt.
cockserver
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, slang, rare) fellator, someone who performs fellatio.
cockshaft etymology cock + shaft
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (informal, vulgar) The shaft of the penis.
    • 2010, Felix Baron, Dominant She writhed beneath him with soft urgency as he pumped into her, his cockshaft feeling the pressure of Portia's fingers through the thin muscular membrane that divided Olivia's vagina from her rectum.
cockshit
interjection: {{en-interj}}
  1. (vulgar) an expression of anger
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, slang, pejorative) an imbecile or other undesirable person
cockshot
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) picture of one's penis
cock snot Alternative forms: cock-snot
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar slang) semen
    • 2006, John Patrick, Secret Passions The guard bounced his cock up, and the cock-snot dolloped onto the floor. Without instruction, Mark lowered his head beneath the towering statue and licked the creamy blob of lubrication up.
Synonyms:
cock sock
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A sock-like garment used to cover the penis
  2. (slang) condom
Synonyms:
cock-stand pronunciation
  • /ˈkɑkˌstænd/
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (archaic, vulgar slang) An erection.
    • 2009, Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall, Fourth Estate 2010, p. 393: ‘Do you know what they do, in France? My lady wife told me. Well, not told me, but she wrote it down for me, in Latin. The man has a cock-stand, and she takes it in her mouth!’
cockster
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (slang, pejorative) a cocky man
cocksucker etymology cock + sucker pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, colloquial, generally pejorative) Someone who performs fellatio.
    • {{quote-book }}
  2. (vulgar, colloquial, pejorative) A very annoying or objectionable person.
    • {{quote-book }}
related terms:
  • cocksucking
  • In both usages, the term is generally applied to males rather than females. It is commonly bowdlerize cs and censored as: c--ksucker / c**ksucker, c--------r / c********r, c--------- / c********** in print.
cocksuckers
noun: {{head}}
  1. (vulgar) plural of cocksucker
cocksucking etymology cock + sucking
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) fellatio
    • 2011, Shannon Gilreath, The End of Straight Supremacy: Realizing Gay Liberation (page 20) Anita Bryant says that cocksucking is a form of human cannibalism; she decries the loss of the child that is the sperm.
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. (vulgar) Used as an intensifier for something objectionable.
    • 2010, Wolf Larsen, Unalaska, Alaska (page 164) “Twenty-five goddamn cocksucking years,” the old man said.
related terms:
  • cocksucker
cocksure
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. (informal) too confident; overconfident I thought myself cocksure of the horse which he readily promised me. — Alexander Pope.
    • 1906, John Galsworthy, , The persistence of the Past is one of those tragicomic blessings which each new age denies, coming cocksure on to the stage to mouth its claim to a perfect novelty.
    • 1920, Sinclair Lewis, The Main Street, These crack specialists, the young scientific fellows, they're so cocksure and so wrapped up in their laboratories that they miss the human element.
cocktail {{wikipedia}} etymology unknown, many unproven stories exist. The word first appeared in 1806 (see citation below). The non-drink sense is by extension of the drink sense.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A mix alcoholic beverage. They visited a pub noted for the wide range of cocktails they serve.
    • 1806, 13 May 1806 edition of Balance and Columbian Repository, published by Hudson, New York, (first appearance in print): Cocktail is a stimulating liquor composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water, and bitters — it is vulgarly called a bittered sling and is supposed to be an excellent electioneering potion, inasmuch as it renders the heart stout and bold, at the same time that it fuddles the head.
  2. A mixture of other substances. Scientists found a cocktail of pollutants in the river downstream from the chemical factory. a cocktail of illegal drugs
  3. A horse, not of pure breed, but having only one eighth or one sixteenth impure blood in its veins. {{rfquotek}}
  4. (UK, slang, dated) A mean, half-hearted fellow; a coward.
    • Thackeray It was in the second affair that poor little Barney showed he was a cocktail.
  5. A species of rove beetle, so called from its habit of elevating the tail.
Synonyms: mixed drink
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. Festive; lively.
    • {{RQ:Fitzgerald Gatsby}} …now the orchestra is playing yellow cocktail music and the opera of voices pitches a key higher.
cocktease etymology From cock + tease.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) One who acts so as to sexually arouse a man, but does not provide sexual release.
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (vulgar) To act so as to sexually arouse a man without providing sexual release.
cock tease {{wikipedia}} etymology cock ‘penis’ + tease.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (slang, vulgar) A person, usually a woman, who teases a man but then withdraws an alluded-to promise of sexual intercourse. That bird is a total cock tease; she's been winding blokes up all night.
  2. (figuratively) Similarly frustrating teasing, not necessarily either sexual or done by a person. This film will come off as one extended cock-tease, never giving them the very thing trailers made them think they’d be getting. (Review of ) [http://badgerherald.com/artsetc/2006/01/19/knoxville_past_his_p.php The Badger Herald] ([[:Wikipedia:University of Wisconsin-Madison|University of Wisconsin-Madison]]).  The Bird Flu Is A Cock-Tease and UPDATE: Bird Flu Still a Cock-Tease! (essays on , using cock as a double entendre meaning male bird and penis) Robinson, Bill (January 16, 2006). [http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bill-robinson/the-bird-flu-is-a-cockte_b_13918.html "The Bird Flu Is A Cock-Tease."] ''[[:Wikipedia:Huffington Post|Huffington Post]]'' Robinson, Bill (April 10, 2006). [http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bill-robinson/update-bird-flu-still-a-_b_18848.html "UPDATE: Bird Flu Still a Cock-Tease!"] ''[[:Wikipedia:Huffington Post|Huffington Post]]''
Synonyms: (person who teases a man with a promise of sex) cock teaser
coordinate terms:
  • (person who teases a man with a promise of sex) clit tease
cockteaser
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (vulgar, slang) A habitual cocktease; someone who is flirtatious and frequently sexually arouses men without providing sexual release.
cock up etymology {{rfe}} The first citation in the Oxford English Dictionary is from a 1948 Dictionary of Forces' Slang. The OED suggests that it derives ultimately from the noun cock, but gives no further detail. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/35336#eid9020739 The nature of the earliest citation suggests that this expression entered the wider language from military slang, making etymologies from typesetting or archery (see below) seem unlikely. The term is sometimes attributed to the days of manual typesetting, when a letter that had become wedged slightly higher than the other letters on the line was said to be "cocked up". The term 'cock up' originates to medieval archery. One of the three feathers on an arrow is a cock's feather. If the arrow was incorrectly placed on the bow for drawing and release, the arrow would go off course because of the cock's feather being up and therefore the arrow positioned wrongly on the bow. This was then known as a 'cock up'.
verb: {{head}}
  1. (mildly, taboo, slang, chiefly, British, NZ) To ruin (something) unintentionally; to screw up, mess up or fuck up.
Synonyms: balls up (mildly taboo slang), bollocks up (British taboo slang), bugger up (British taboo slang), mess up, muck up, fuck up (taboo slang), screw up, fuck up (vulgar), mess up (very mild), screw up (mildly vulgar)
related terms:
  • cock-up {{pos n}}
cock-up
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (mildly, taboo slang) A mistake.
Synonyms: balls-up (mildly taboo slang), tits-up (mildly taboo slang), foul-up, fuck-up (taboo slang), screw-up (slang)
cocky pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
etymology 1 From cockatoo + y.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. Abbreviation of cockatoo; used when pretending to talk to such a bird, as in "hello cocky".
    • 2005 August 5, The World Today: Town seeks environmental accreditation, radio programme, transcript, Visit the local store at Coles Bay and you′re greeted by a talking cocky called Jim.
  2. (Australia, New Zealand, colloquial) A cockatoo farmer.
    • 1907, , Human Toll, Gutenberg Australia eBook #0607531, ‘We camped one evening at Narrangidgery Creek, close b′ a cocky′s ′umstead.…’
    • 1946, , My Career Goes Bung, Gutenberg Australia eBook #0900281, Burrawong was one of the larger stations in which much of the good land of the district was locked. The cockies usually had to follow the main road, but since the drought the owners had opened one of their permanent water-holes so that the poorer settlers could cart water to their homesteads.
    • 2001 November 19, Shelley Horton, Media Dimensions: Episode 15, TV programme, transcript, And stories in the bush may not seem relevant in the big smoke, but try telling that to a cocky.
    • 2010, Jackie French, A Waltz for Matilda, [http//books.google.com.au/books?id=Q3rwbG0oVSAC&pg=PT415&dq=%22cocky%22|%22cockies%22+farm+-intitle:%22cocky%22+-inauthor:%22%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ZZMsT6fpIIy6iAfVk8HwDg&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22cocky%22|%22cockies%22%20farm%20-intitle%3A%22cocky%22%20-inauthor%3A%22%22&f=false unnumbered page], Now — well, Moura was scarcely Drinkwater, but it was more than just a cocky farm too.
  3. (New Zealand, informal) A sheep farmer.
  • (farmer) In both Australia and New Zealand, forms such as sheep cocky (sheep farmer) and cow cocky (dairy farmer) exist. In New Zealand, cocky is often synonymous with sheep cocky, due to the relative importance of the industry.
Synonyms: (bird) birdie, (farmer) crofter; see also farmer
etymology 2 From cocksure + y.
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. Overly confident, arrogant and boastful.
    • 1881 November 29, Sir Ernest Mason Satow, Letter to William George Aston, 2008, Sir Ernest Mason Satow, Ian Ruxton (editor), Sir Ernest Satow's Private Letters to W.G. Aston and F.V. Dickins: The Correspondence of a Pioneer Japanologist from 1870 to 1918, [http//books.google.com.au/books?id=Xg6RgEkbFsgC&pg=PA66&dq=%22cockier%22|%22cockiest%22+-intitle:%22cocky%22+-inauthor:%22%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=RfosT--gIemeiAeYtODxDg&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22cockier%22|%22cockiest%22%20-intitle%3A%22cocky%22%20-inauthor%3A%22%22&f=false page 66], Hodges has made a great fool of himself, by getting gradually cockier and cockier.
    • 2008, Gerard Thomas, Nightwarrior Chronicles: All Girls′ Team, [http//books.google.com.au/books?id=49i-YGO1O80C&pg=PA85&dq=%22cockier%22|%22cockiest%22+-intitle:%22cocky%22+-inauthor:%22%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=RfosT--gIemeiAeYtODxDg&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22cockier%22|%22cockiest%22%20-intitle%3A%22cocky%22%20-inauthor%3A%22%22&f=false page 85], The confidence that was temporarily humbled now returned with a cockier attitude.
    • 2011, Melanie Harvey, Indispensable Friendship & Death Collide, [http//books.google.com.au/books?id=D2F3d7rxkz0C&pg=PA204&dq=%22cockier%22|%22cockiest%22+-intitle:%22cocky%22+-inauthor:%22%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=RfosT--gIemeiAeYtODxDg&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22cockier%22|%22cockiest%22%20-intitle%3A%22cocky%22%20-inauthor%3A%22%22&f=false page 204], You smiling your oh-so-perfect smile and me with the biggest, cockiest grin on my face you can ever imagine. I would have been the cockiest man alive that night knowing you were going home with me.
Synonyms: See also
cocky's joy etymology {{rfe}}
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (Australia, informal) Golden syrup.
    • 2000, Barbara Santich, In the Land of the Magic Pudding: A Gastronomic Miscellany, page 156, There are, incidentally, few things more Australian than damper with ‘cocky′s joy’, which is the bushman′s name for golden syrup.
    • 2007, Ted Henzell, Australian Agriculture: Its History and Challenges, page 246, Tradition has it that their main meal in later colonial times consisted chiefly of salt meat, potatoes and pumpkin stewed in a camp oven all day,139 with damper and golden syrup (cocky′s joy) for pudding, and no fruit at all. Tasmanian jam was available from the 1860s onwards, but it was up to four times as expensive as the cocky′s joy,140 which consisted entirely of caramelised sugar.
    • 2010, Kathleen M. McGinley, Out of the Daydream: Based on the Autobiography of Barry Mcginley Jones, page 20, Aussie food was a refined version of what the early convicts used to eat. Bully beef and spuds, tripe, fish′n chips, Anzac bikkies, damper with cocky′s joy (golden syrup), snags (or mystery bags) and hot custard and jelly for sweets.
coconut {{wikipedia}} Alternative forms: cocoanut etymology From coco + nut. pronunciation
  • (US) /ˈkoʊ.kə.nʌt/
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A fruit of the coconut palm (not a true nut), Cocos nucifera, having a fibrous husk surrounding a large seed.
  2. A hard-shelled seed of this fruit, having white flesh and a fluid-filled central cavity.
  3. (uncountable) The edible white flesh of this fruit.
  4. The coconut palm.
  5. (pejorative, ethnic slur) A Hispanic or dark-skinned person who acts “white” (Caucasian), alluding to the fact that a coconut is brown on the outside and white on the inside. Compare banana.
  6. (South Africa, pejorative) A black person who thinks "white" (European). Compare banana.
  7. (New Zealand, pejorative) A Pacific islander.
  8. (slang) A female breast.
coordinate terms:
  • (acting white) banana, Oreo, Twinkie
cod {{wikipedia}} pronunciation
  • (UK) /kɒd/
  • (US) /kɑd/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
  • (in General American: {{rhymes}}
etymology 1 From Middle English cod, codde, from Old English cod, codd, from Proto-Germanic *kuddô, from Proto-Indo-European *gewt-, from *gew-, *gū-. Cognate with Scots cod, codd, coad, kod, Low German Koden, Kon, Dutch kodde, Danish kodde, Swedish kudde, Faroese koddi, Icelandic koddi.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (obsolete) A small bag or pouch. {{rfquotek}}
  2. (UK, obsolete) A husk or integument; a pod.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke XV: And he wolde fayne have filled his bely with the coddes, that the swyne ate: and noo man gave hym.
    {{rfquotek}}
  3. (now rare) The scrotum (also in plural).
    • 1646, Sir Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, III.4: that which we call castoreum … are not the same to be termed testicles or stones; for these cods or follicles are found in both sexes, though somewhat more protuberant in the male.
    {{rfquotek}}
  4. (obsolete or UK dialectal, Scotland) A pillow or cushion. {{rfquotek}}
etymology 2 Origin uncertain; perhaps ultimately the same as Etymology 1, above.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. The Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.
  2. The sea fish of the genus Gadus generally, as inclusive of the Pacific and Greenland cod.
  3. The sea fish of the family Gadidae which are sold as "cod", as haddock and whiting.
  4. (informal, usually with qualifiers) Other unrelated fish which are similarly important to regional fisheries, as the hapuku and cultus cod.
  5. (informal, usually with qualifiers) Other unrelated fish which resemble the Atlantic cod, as the rock cod and blue cod.
The term Atlantic cod is now used where it is desired to distinguish the other members of Gadus or the Gadidae. Similar qualifiers are used to distinguish the other members, as well as the unrelated fish in the term's other senses. The plural form cod has become more common than the form cods.
hypernyms:
  • anacanthini
  • demersal fish
  • gadiformes
  • whitefish
Synonyms: (Atlantic cod) milwell (many variants), Scotch cod, common cod, (Pacific cod) gray cod, grey cod, grayfish, greyfish, (Greenland cod) ogac, (other fish marketed as cod) haddock, whiting, (air-dried, unsalted) stockfish, (freshly-salted) greenfish, green fish, green cod, white cod, (dried & salted) clipfish, salt cod, dry cod, ling, haberdine, (unrelated major local species) hapuku, (unrelated similar species) rock cod, rockcod, beardie (Lotella rhacina), cod icefish (the Nototheniidae), marbled rockcod (Notothenia rossii), emerald rockcod (Trematomus bernacchii), honeycomb rockcod, dwarf spotted rockcod (Epinephelus merra), Maori cod, Magellanic rockcod, blue notothenia, orange throat notothen (Paranotothenia magellanica), brown spotted reef cod, brownspotted grouper (Epinephelus chlorostigma), red rock cod, vermilion rockcod, red snapper, vermilion seaperch, vermilion rockfish (Sebastes miniatus), grouper (the Serranidae), thornyhead (the Sebastidae)
hyponyms:
  • (young) codling
  • (small, obsolete) morhwell
  • (consumed codlings) scrod
  • (cured in lye) lutefisk
  • (pancakes) bacalaito
etymology 3 Origin unknown.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A joke or an imitation. I assume it all could just be a cod.
  2. A stupid or foolish person. He's making a right cod of himself.
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. Having the character of imitation; jocular. (now usually attributive, forming mostly compound adjectives). “Illegitimi non carborundum” is a well-known example of cod Latin. Dalton categorises Muse's latest composition as “cod-classical bombast”.
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (slang, transitive, dialectal) To attempt to deceive or confuse.
anagrams:
  • CDO
  • doc, Doc, DOC
  • OCD
  • ODC
CODBLOPS
proper noun: {{en-proper noun}}
  1. (video games, slang) abbreviation of Call of Duty: Black Ops
    • {{quote-magazine }}
    • {{quote-newsgroup }}
    • {{quote-web }}
    • {{quote-newsgroup }}
    • {{quote-magazine }}
Synonyms: BLOPS
code {{wikipedia}} {{wikipedia}} etymology From Old French code, from Latin codex, later form of caudex. pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A short symbol, often with little relation to the item it represents. exampleThis flavour of soup has been assigned the code WRT-9.
  2. A body of law, sanctioned by legislation, in which the rules of law to be specifically applied by the courts are set forth in systematic form; a compilation of laws by public authority; a digest.
    • Francis Wharton (1820-1899) The collection of laws made by the order of Justinian is sometimes called, by way of eminence, "The Code".
  3. Any system of principles, rules or regulations relating to one subject; as, the medical code, a system of rules for the regulation of the professional conduct of physicians; the naval code, a system of rules for making communications at sea means of signals.
  4. A set of rules for converting information into another form or representation.
    1. By synecdoche: a codeword, code point, an encoded representation of a character, symbol, or other entity. exampleThe ASCII code of "A" is 65.
  5. A message represented by rules intended to conceal its meaning.
    • {{quote-magazine}}
  6. (cryptography) A cryptographic system using a codebook that converts words or phrases into codewords.
  7. (programming, uncountable) Instructions for a computer, written in a programming language; the input of a translator, an interpreter or a browser, namely: source code, machine code, bytecode. exampleObject-oriented C++ code is easier to understand for a human than C code. exampleI wrote some code to reformat text documents.
    1. By synecdoche: any piece of a program, of a document or something else written in a computer language. exampleThis HTML code may be placed on your web page.
related terms:
  • codex
  • codifier
  • codify
  • codification
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (computing) To write software programs. I learned to code on an early home computer in the 1980s.
  2. To categorise by assigning identifiers from a schedule, for example CPT coding for medical insurance purposes.
  3. (cryptography) To encode. We should code the messages we sent out on Usenet.
  4. (medicine) Of a patient, to suffer a sudden medical emergency such as cardiac arrest.
  5. (genetics, intransitive) To encode a protein.
anagrams:
  • coed, co-ed
  • OECD
code face etymology From code and coalface.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (computing, informal) The place where programmer develop source code (as opposed to conceptually distant areas such as design and marketing).
    • 1992, Patrick A V Hall, Software reuse and reverse engineering in practice‎ ...hype merchants of the computing world are up and running off towards the horizon before the IS workers toiling away at the code face are even crawling.
    • 1992, Derek Partridge, Engineering artificial intelligence software‎ Why is it that, everywhere we look in the software world from academics, for whom computation is an abstract notion way above the trivializing clutter of actual computers, to hard-core systems designers and programmers, people actually working at the code face (as it were), we encounter this urge to apologize for the current techniques and to seek improvement?
    • 1999, "Barb Knox", Y2K Optimism: Unjustified in survey (discussion on Internet newsgroup comp.software.year-2000) This was a CIO Magazine poll of senior managers, not a poll of programmers at the codeface. Programmers will get enough deserved blame in the Y2k aftermath; please don't incite undeserved blame.
    • 2003, Robert L Glass, Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering Documentation is at least one conceptual step away from the code-face, out of date the moment it's written, and difficult to write...
    • 2007, Pete Goodliffe, Code craft: the practice of writing excellent code‎ Code craft starts at the codeface; it's where we love to be. We programmers are never happier than when immersed in an editor, bashing out line after line of perfectly formed and well-executed source code.
Alternative forms: codeface
codehead etymology code + head
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (slang) A computer programming enthusiast.
    • 1997, "William Coleman", Clinton acknowledges the growing Y2K panic (on newsgroup comp.software.year-2000) Indeed, a friend of mine who owns a coin-shop in the San Francisco Bay Area reported to me that he already has codeheads coming in to buy gold from him.
    • Steven Levy, The Trend Spotter (in 2006, Brendan I. Koerner, The Best of Technology Writing 2006) In serif type over a glossy white background, there is the title, often naming a computer language or protocol familiar to codeheads and gibberish to everyone else (JavaServer Faces; Essential CVS; Using Samba, 2nd Edition).
code monkey
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (slang, sometimes, derogatory) A computer programmer.
codhead etymology From cod + head, owing to the prevalence of fishing in the area of North Shields and Grimsby.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (Geordie, humorous) Person from North Shields a town in the northeast of England.
  2. (British) A person from Hull a fishing town in the north of England.
  3. (British) A person from Whitby, a town in the northeast of England.
  4. (British) A person from Fleetwood, a town in the northwest of Lancashire.
Codies etymology Diminutive with -ie.
proper noun: {{en-proper noun}}
  1. (informal, video games) The video game development company (formerly Code Masters).
    • 1989, Contents (in Crash magazine issue 89, June 1991) Five power-packed pages of game thrills - more than ever before! On the Powertape: Astroclone (Hewson)! Sea Battles (Atlantis!). Skull & Crossbones demo (Tengen)! On The Run (Design Design)! Soccer Cup Quizmaster (Powertape)! and Pokemania! Plus (gasp!) on your Codies tape: Phantomas, Dizzy, BMX Simulator and Fruit Machine Simulator! Blimey!
    • 1992, James Leach, Bubble Dizzy (game review in Your Sinclair magazine issue 74, February 1992) The Codies seem to take great delight in mistreating their little pet egg, Dizzy. He's been thumped, kicked, bashed, scrambled and dropped in his games so far. Now the cruel so and sos want to drown him.
    • 2002, "Rod Prince", Adelaide Clipsal 500 and Codemasters (discussion on Internet newsgroup rec.autos.simulators) Well, obviously it was since they're {{SIC}} now got an interview with a codies rep, however, suggesting a May release.
anagrams:
  • cosied
codology etymology From cod + ology.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (Ireland, colloquial) hoaxing, humbugging, bluffing, deception.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses (novel): Bloom comes out with the why and the wherefore and all the codology of the business.
    • 6 June 2004, Hugh Leonard, A night with Hilton and Michael, Sunday Independent: Being an Englishman, Hilton had no time for codology.
Synonyms: kidology
codswallop Alternative forms: cod's wallop etymology unknown, attested from 1959 episode of UK TV series . The writers (Galton and Simpson) state that the phrase was in general use when the show was broadcast.{{R:Phrase Finder|codswallop|A load of codswallop}}[http://web.archive.org/web/20090305064036/http://oed.com/bbcwords/codswallop-new.html codswallop], DRAFT REVISON Jan. 2006, OED Online, archived from [http://oed.com/bbcwords/codswallop-new.html original] on 2009–03–09 A national TV appeal in the UK in 2006 failed to find earlier references. Originally written (1963) codswallop, spelling cod's wallop is later. Various etymologies are proposed from some sense of cod, such as from cod (as in codpiece), from cod + wallop, hence cod + wallop “imitation beer” (with interconsonantal -s- to ease pronunciation of -dw-), or from cod (some part of the fish, as from fishing industry). A frequently given etymology, rejected as a folk etymology, derives it from Hiram Codd, British soft drink maker of the 1870s, known for the eponymous Codd-neck bottle, with the suggestion that codswallop is a derisive term for soft drinks by beer drinkers, from Codd’s + wallop “Codd’s beer (sarcastic)”. This is widely rejected – there is no evidence that early uses had this sense, the slang wallop comes later than Codd’s lifetime, initial spellings (1963 in print) do not reflect such a derivation (*Codd’s wallop and *coddswallop with -dd- are not found), and there is an 80 year gap between proposed coinage and attestation. This is also the name given to the wooden device placed over the neck of a codd bottle and given a push (wallop) to dislodge the marble in the neck of the bottle. The word has also been used to describe the process of opening a codd bottle. pronunciation
  • (UK) /ˌkɒdzˈwɒl.əp/
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (UK, slang) Senseless talk or writing; nonsense.
    • 1959 , , Tony: I was not. Sidney: Don’t give me that old codswallop. You were counting your money.
    • 1963 October 17, Radio Times, 52/2, Just branding a programme as ‘rubbish’, ‘tripe’, or—there are a lot of these—‘codswallop’, gives little indication of what moved the viewer to write.
    • 1981 October 1, John Turner, Review: Autumn Books: Prometheus bounded?, , page 41, An interviewer from a Warsaw radio station stopped a citizen in the street. Was the recent demonstration necessary? “History will tell.” But what did he think? “I am not a historian.” Likewise Lumsden′s and Wilson′s book. If it is not a load of codswallop, it will turn out to be very important. If it is not a load of codswallop. Faites vos jeux!
    • 1993, J. Neville Turner, The One-Day Game – Cricket or Codswallop?, in 2001, David John Headon, The Best Ever Australian Sports Writing: A 200 Year Collection.
    • 2010, Grahame Howard, The Wishing Book 3 – Extermination, page 66, “I′ve told you all I know,” Rosa Armaz told Boarski and Yermin, “I don′t know what my husband has been doing. He′d mentioned going to Mars with the children but I thought it was a load of codswallop.”
Synonyms: See also
co-ed Alternative forms: coed etymology Short for the original phrase co-educational referring to an educational institution that taught males and females together.
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. Of an educational institution, that teaches both males and females.
  2. Of any location, that mixes males and females.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (US, dated, informal) A young woman who attends college.
    • 1980, Dan Millman, Way of the Peaceful Warrior: I gazed wistfully at the pretty coeds.
  2. (US, dated, informal) A (generally young) woman, especially on the campus of a college or other educational institute.
anagrams:
  • code, OECD
cœliæ Alternative forms: coeliae, cœlias (colloquial)
noun: {{head}}
  1. en-irregular plural of cœlia
coffee {{wikipedia}} etymology From 1582 via Dutch koffie, from Italian caffè, from Turkish kahve, from Arabic قهوة 〈qhwẗ〉, from omv (kafa) and in Arabic language coffee بن 〈bn〉. That word comes from Amharic ቡና 〈ቡና〉. pronunciation
  • (UK) /ˈkɒf.i/; (Conservative RP) /kɔːfɪ/ (dated)
  • {{audio}}
  • (US) /ˈkɔ.fi/
  • (US) /ˈkɑ.fi/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A beverage made by infusing the bean of the coffee plant in hot water.
    • {{RQ:RBrtn AntmyMlncly}}, II.5.1.v: The Turks have a drink called coffa (for they use no wine), so named of a berry as black as soot, and as bitter{{nb...}}, which they sip still of, and sup as warm as they can suffer{{nb...}}.
    • {{RQ:Chmbrs YngrSt}} "He was here," observed Drina composedly, "and father was angry with him." ¶ "What?" exclaimed Eileen. "When?" ¶ "This morning, before father went downtown." ¶ Both Selwyn and Lansing cut in coolly, dismissing the matter with a careless word or two; and coffee was served—cambric tea in Drina's case.
    • 2008, Agnes Poirier, The Guardian, 12 April: As I sip a coffee at Brasserie Balzar, two well-known intellectuals, one publisher and a Sorbonne professor were discussing Sarkozy's future: "He won't finish his mandate" says one.
    • {{quote-magazine}}
  2. The seeds of the plant used to make coffee, misnamed ‘beans’ due to their shape.
  3. A tropical plant of the genus Coffea.
  4. {{rft-sense}} A pale brown colour, like that of milk coffee. {{color panel}}
  5. The end of the meal—when coffee is usually served. exampleHe did not stay for coffee.
Synonyms: ,
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. Of a pale brown colour, like that of milk coffee.
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (intransitive) To drink coffee.
    • 1839, Thomas Chandler Haliburton, The Clockmaker I rushed into my cabin, coffeed, wined, and went to bed sobbing.
    • 2010, Patrick Day, Too Late in the Afternoon: One Man's Triumph Over Depression It was exactly 11 a.m. We had been coffeeing for one hour, and our coffee cups were empty.
coffeed out
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. (US, slang) To have had enough coffee for now.
  2. feeling jumpy; caffeine-nervous; feeling any of the symptoms of caffeine overload
    • "I don't want another cup, thanks. I'm all coffeed out."
Synonyms: See also
coffin {{wikipedia}} Alternative forms: cophin (archaic) etymology From Middle English cofin, from onf cofin, from Latin cophinus, a loanword from Ancient Greek κόφινος 〈kóphinos〉. pronunciation
  • (RP) /ˈkɒfɪn/
  • (US) /ˈkɔfɪn/
  • (US) /ˈkɑfɪn/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
  • {{rhymes}}
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. An oblong closed box in which a dead person is buried.
  2. (obsolete) A basket.
    • Wycliffe's Bible And all ate, and were filled. And they took the reliefs of broken gobbets, twelve coffins full (Matthew 14:20).
  3. A casing or crust, or a mold, of pastry, as for a pie.
    • Shakespeare Of the paste a coffin I will rear.
  4. (obsolete) A conical paper bag, used by grocers. {{rfquotek}}
  5. The hollow crust or hoof of a horse's foot, below the coronet, in which is the coffin bone.
{{Webster 1913}} The type of coffin with upholstery and a half-open lid (mostly in the United States) is called a casket. Synonyms: casket (US)
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (transitive) To place in a coffin.
    • 2007, Barbara Everett, "Making and Breaking in Shakespeare's Romances," London Review of Books, 29:6, p. 21: The chest in which she is coffined washes ashore and is brought to the Lord Cerimon.
Synonyms: encoffin
coffin dodger
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (slang, derogatory, humorous) An elderly person.
coffin nail
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (slang) cigarette
Synonyms: cancer stick
coinkidink etymology Jocular alteration of coincidence. pronunciation
  • (UK) /kəʊˈɪŋkiːdɪŋk/
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (humorous, informal) A coincidence.
Alternative forms: coinkydink
coinkydink etymology Jocular alteration of coincidence. pronunciation
  • (UK) /kəʊˈɪŋkiːdɪŋk/
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (humorous, informal) A coincidence.
Alternative forms: coinkidink
coin purse
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A small bag or pouch designed for carrying money, particularly coin.
    • 2007, Alissa Hall, Slave of God: A Devadasi's Tale, Raven's Perch Press (2007), ISBN 9781847288462, page 368: “I have gold,” Mananda repeated to the men as they drew closer, and he shook his coin purse, ringing the coins together.
    • 2011, Rebecca Foster, The Beaches: A Journey of Answers, iUniverse (2011), ISBN 9781462018307, page 28: As I grabbed my donuts and turned, all the change from my coin purse flew out and landed all over the store floor, under twenty sets of feet.
    • 2013, Elizabeth Bass, The Way Back to Happiness, Kensington Books (2013), ISBN 9780758281425, unnumbered page: “I can't find the change I got from the gas station.” She snapped open her coin purse in hopes that she'd stuck it there.
  2. (slang) Testicles.
    • 2007, Ryan Ball, "Web Favorite ‘Odd’ Todd Rosenberg", Animation Magazine, 23 March 2007: Before YouTube debuted with countless videos of dudes getting kicked in the coin purse, one of the hottest things on the Internet was Laid Off, a series of animated shorts about a guy in a blue bathrobe who reflects on his joblessness.
    • 2012, Peter Cavanaugh, "Reviewing the Kevin Love face stomp", Impose, 7 February 2012: That is partially what was so great about the brief interaction between Kevin Love and Louis Scola the other night. It was malicious, perhaps, and invites us to qualify dirty play and physical play, but it was a shade of Laimbeer – boys being boys. A week or so ago, Scola had chicken legged Love – a la every schoolyard basketball game – while attempting to save the ball from going out of bounds, only he tagged Love in his coin purse.
    • 2013, "A brief history of movie characters getting whacked in the balls", Westword (Denver, Colorado), 24 January 2013: The classy trend of kneeing a man in his coin purse once seemed fresh. Like Paul Newman kicking that baddie in the nuts in Butch Cassidy.
  3. (informal) a type of theatrical performance undergarment used to hide male genitalia, by stuffing it into a pouch with a drawstring, to simulate being nude
Synonyms: (small bag or pouch for carrying money) change purse., (testicles) see ., (undergarment) coin pouch
coordinate terms:
  • (undergarment) dancing belt , manties
cojones {{wikipedia}} etymology Borrowing from Spanish cojones, plural of cojón, from vl *coleonem, accusative of coleo, from cōleus. pronunciation
  • /kəˈhoʊˌneɪs/, /kəˈhoʊniːz/
noun: {{en-plural noun}}
  1. (slang, usually considered vulgar) testicles
  2. (slang, usually considered vulgar) balls, bollocks, courage, machismo, chutzpah
Coke {{wikipedia}} Alternative forms: coke etymology abbreviation of Coca-Cola See coke.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (uncountable, informal) Cola-based soft drink.
    1. (in particular) Coca-Cola.
  2. (countable, informal) A bottle, glass or can of a cola-based soft drink.
    1. (in particular) A bottle, glass or can of Coca-Cola.
    I want a Coke.
  3. (US, especially, Southern US, informal) Any soft drink, regardless of type.
Synonyms: (soft drink) see the list at soda
coke {{wikipedia}} pronunciation
  • kəʊk
  • {{rhymes}}
etymology 1 Perhaps from Middle English colke.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (uncountable) Solid residue from roasting coal in a coke oven; used principally as a fuel and in the production of steel and formerly as a domestic fuel.
    • The plant should produce approximately 550,000 tons of screened blast furnace coke per year.
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (transitive) To produce coke from coal.
  2. (intransitive) To turn into coke.
etymology 2 Originated circa 1908 in American English as a shortening of cocaine.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (informal, slang, uncountable) Cocaine.
etymology 3 1909, from the name of the American company Coca-Cola and the beverage it produced; the drink was named for two of its original ingredients, coca leaves and cola nut.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (uncountable, informal) alternative case form of Coke cola-based soft drink, especially Coca-Cola.
  2. (countable, informal) alternative case form of Coke a serving of cola-based soft drink, especially Coca-Cola.
  3. (US, chiefly, Southern US, informal) alternative case form of Coke any soft drink, regardless of type.
Synonyms: (soft drink) see the list at soda
cokebottle
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (informal, computing) An unusual character, or one that is difficult to type (especially because it requires a combination of key presses)
coke dick
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (uncountable, idiomatic, slang) Erectile dysfunction caused by cocaine use.
    • 1997, Michael Stone, The Low End of Nowhere, Penguin (1997), ISBN 9780140246940, page 77: Half the time we went to bed, he'd get coke dick and we'd just sit around talking.
    • 2007, Annie Oakley, Working Sex: Sex Workers Write about a Changing Industry, Seal Press (2007), ISBN 9781580052252, page 17: “He's got coke dick,” says Tia Lee flatly.
    • 2012, Heather Rutman, The Girl's Guide to Depravity: How to Get Laid Without Getting Screwed, Running Press (2012), ISBN 9780762445356, unnumbered page: Another perk of fucking a nice guy is that he was never too drunk or too fucked up on drugs, so he never got whiskey or coke dick.
  2. (countable, idiomatic, slang) A penis that is flaccid as a result of cocaine-induced erectile dysfunction.
    • 2000, 4 August, justin_sane22, Re: Are VNV Aethiests?, http://groups.google.com/group/rec.music.industrial/msg/2c32fa98fbf26256?dmode=source, rec.music.industrial, “Anyways, how does Stephan fuck all his groupies with a coke dick?”
    • 2006, Suzanne Portnoy, The Butcher, The Baker, The Candlestick Maker, Virgin Books (2008), ISBN 9780753511015, page 106: I really wanted to get fucked but I could see that wasn't going to happen, not with a coke dick, but he really loved giving oral, I discovered.
    • 2010, Paul Provenza & Dan Dion, ¡Satiristas!: Comedians, Contrarians, Raconteurs & Vulgarians, HarperCollins (2010), ISBN 9780061859342, page 264: You'd look down and see your horribly shriveled coke dick and think, “Maybe coke's not so great.”
Synonyms:
cokehead etymology From coke + head.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (pejorative, slang) A person who regularly uses cocaine.
colada
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (informal) piña colada
    • 2011, Kayla Perrin, Single Mama Drama I wanted to give Debbie all the details of the weekend so she knew I hadn't hung around the bar drinking coladas the entire time.
COLAtard Alternative forms: colatard etymology COLA + tard
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (slang, derogatory, internet) A participant in comp.os.linux.advocacy, a Usenet newsgroup promoting the Linux operating system.
cold etymology From Middle English cold, from Old English cald, ċeald, from Proto-Germanic *kaldaz, a participle form of *kalaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gel-. Cognate with Scots cald, cauld, Western Frisian kâld, Dutch koud, Low German kold, koolt, koold, German kalt, Danish kold, Norwegian Bokmål kald, Swedish kall. pronunciation
  • (UK) /kəʊld/, /kɔʊld/
  • (US) {{enPR}}, /koʊld/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{audio}}
  • {{homophones}}
  • {{rhymes}}
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. (of a thing) Having a low temperature. exampleA cold wind whistled through the trees.
    • {{RQ:Wodehouse Offing}}
  2. (of the weather) Causing the air to be cold. exampleThe forecast is that it will be very cold today.
  3. (of a person or animal) Feeling the sensation of coldness, especially to the point of discomfort. exampleShe was so cold she was shivering.
  4. Unfriendly, emotionally distant or unfeeling. exampleShe shot me a cold glance before turning her back.
    • 2011 April 23, Doctor Who, series 6, episode 1, The Impossible Astronaut: RIVER SONG (upon seeing the still-living DOCTOR, moments after he made her and two other friends watch what they thought was his death): This is cold. Even by your standards, this is cold.
    • {{RQ:Wodehouse Offing}}
  5. Dispassionate, not prejudiced or partisan, impartial. exampleLet's look at this tomorrow with a cold head. exampleHe's a nice guy, but the cold facts say we should fire him. exampleThe cold truth is that states rarely undertake military action unless their national interests are at stake.
  6. Completely unprepared; without introduction. exampleHe was assigned cold calls for the first three months.
  7. Unconscious or deeply asleep; deprived of the metaphorical heat associated with life or consciousness. exampleI knocked him out cold. exampleAfter one more beer he passed out cold.
  8. (usually with "have" or "know" transitively) Perfectly, exactly, completely; by heart. examplePractice your music scales until you know them cold. exampleTry both these maneuvers until you have them cold and can do them in the dark without thinking. exampleRehearse your lines until you have them down cold. exampleKeep that list in front of you, or memorize it cold.
  9. (usually with "have" transitively) Cornered, done for. exampleWith that receipt, we have them cold for fraud. exampleCriminal interrogation. Initially they will dream up explanations faster than you could ever do so, but when they become fatigued, often they will acknowledge that you have them cold.
    • {{RQ:Wodehouse Offing}}
  10. (obsolete) Not pungent or acrid.
    • Francis Bacon (1561-1626) cold plants
  11. (obsolete) Unexciting; dull; uninteresting.
    • Ben Jonson (1572-1637) What a deal of cold business doth a man misspend the better part of life in!
    • Joseph Addison (1672-1719) The jest grows cold…when it comes on in a second scene.
  12. Affecting the sense of smell (as of hunting dogs) only feebly; having lost its odour. examplea cold scent
  13. (obsolete) Not sensitive; not acute.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Smell this business with a sense as cold / As is a dead man's nose.
  14. Distant; said, in the game of hunting for some object, of a seeker remote from the thing concealed. Compare warm and hot. exampleYou're cold … getting warmer … hot! You've found it!
  15. (painting) Having a bluish effect; not warm in colour.
Synonyms: (of a thing, having a low temperature) chilled, chilly, freezing, frigid, glacial, icy, cool, (of the weather) (UK) brass monkeys, nippy, parky, taters, (of a person or animal), (unfriendly) aloof, distant, hostile, standoffish, unfriendly, unwelcoming, (unprepared) unprepared, unready, See also
antonyms:
  • (having a low temperature) baking, boiling, heated, hot, scorching, searing, torrid, warm
  • (of the weather) hot (See the corresponding synonyms of hot.)
  • (of a person or animal) hot (See the corresponding synonyms of hot.)
  • (unfriendly) amiable, friendly, welcoming
  • (unprepared) prepared, primed, ready
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A condition of low temperature. Come in, out of the cold.
  2. (medicine) A common, usually harmless, viral illness, usually with congestion of the nasal passage and sometimes fever. I caught a miserable cold and had to stay home for a week.
Synonyms: (low temperature) coldness, (illness) common cold, coryza, head cold
coordinate terms:
  • freeze, frost
adverb: {{en-adv}}
  1. While at low temperature. The steel was processed cold.
  2. Without preparation. The speaker went in cold and floundered for a topic.
  3. With finality. I knocked him out cold.
statistics:
  • {{rank}}
anagrams:
  • clod
cold as a witch's tit
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. (simile, colloquial, humorous) Very cold.
  • Generally used to describe weather.
coldcock Alternative forms: cold cock, cold-cock
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (slang) To strike someone so forcefully that they are rendered unconscious.
cold cock Alternative forms: coldcock, cold-cock
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (slang) A small heavy object used to give additional force to a punch or other blow of the hand.
    • 1993, The Journal of Irish Literature, page 14 I had my hand on the lead cold cock and I knew it would not be enough. "Give this man a beer, Sport," […]. I hit him on the temple with the cold cock.
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (slang) To hit someone with a cold cock.
  2. (slang) To hit someone with a club, bottle, or any object that gives additional force to the blow.
  3. (slang) To knock someone unconscious.
    • 1992, Ken Kesey, Sailor Song, page 153 "I can't believe it. You cold-cocked the big stud." "He blindsided and cold-cocked him," Greer said proudly.
cold fish etymology First used by in The Winter's Tale.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (idiomatic) A heartless individual; a person lacking empathy and emotion.
    • 1610, , The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4: [I]t was thought she was a woman and was turned into a cold fish for she would not exchange flesh with one that loved her.
    • 1993, , Turning Point: He wouldn't have thought her such a cold fish. Pity. Still, there was plenty of time. Perhaps when she got used to his company she would thaw a little.
    • 2003, , The Blind Man of Seville, ISBN 9780156028806, page 13: You're a cold fish. You have no heart.
  2. (slang) A sexual partner who, during copulation, lacks vigor or emotional reciprocity.
Synonyms: wet blanket
collab etymology Shortened form of collaboration.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (informal) A collaboration (especially a work produced by several musician who do not usually work together).
collagey etymology collage + y
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. (informal) collagelike
    • 1994, David Tushingham, Food for the soul: a new generation of British theatremakers And they end up being quite collagey sort of pieces, almost like a revue, a series of sketches.
colloquialism etymology colloquial + ism
noun: {{en-noun}} {{wikipedia}}
  1. A colloquial word or phrase; a common spoken expression, often regional.
colloquialisms
noun: {{head}}
  1. plural of colloquialism
colloquialities
noun: {{head}}
  1. plural of colloquiality
colloquiality etymology colloquial + ity
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (uncountable) The state or condition of being colloquial; colloquialness.
  2. (countable) A colloquial term, utterance, etc.; a colloquialism.
colloquializations
noun: {{head}}
  1. plural of colloquialization
colloquialize Alternative forms: colloquialise etymology colloquial + ize
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (transitive) To render colloquial.
    • 1965, John Whitney Hall, Richard King Beardsley, Twelve doors to Japan Some felt that a colloquialized style should be expressed in romanization.
colloquialized
verb: {{head}}
  1. en-past of colloquialize
colloquializes
verb: {{head}}
  1. en-third-person singular of colloquialize
colloquializing
verb: {{head}}
  1. present participle of colloquialize
colloquially
adverb: {{en-adv}}
  1. In a colloquial manner. Cattle, colloquially referred to as cows, are domesticated ungulates.
colloquium etymology From Latin colloquium. pronunciation
  • /kəˈləʊkwiːəm/, {{enPR}}
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A colloquy; a meeting for discussion.
  2. An academic meeting or seminar usually led by a different lecturer and on a different topic at each meeting.
  3. An address to an academic meeting or seminar.
  4. (legal) That part of the complaint or declaration in an action for defamation which shows that the words complained of were spoken concerning the plaintiff.
Note that while colloquial refers specifically to informal conversation, colloquy and colloquium refer instead to formal conversation.
quotations:
  • 1876: Stephen Dowell, A History of Taxation and Taxes in England, I. 87. Writs were issued to London and the other towns principally concerned, directing the mayor and sheriffs to send to a colloquium at York two or three citizens with full power to treat on behalf of the community of the town.
collywobbles etymology Attested 1823, presumably from colic + wobble.{{R:Phrase Finder|97050|The collywobbles}}[http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=collywobbles&searchmode=none Etymonline] Alternative theories are that it derives from colly, via the putative sense “ill from breathing coal dust,” or that it is a corruption of cholera.{{R:Merriam Webster Online}} The first attestation (a mention, not a usage) is in the 1823 edition of A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue. pronunciation
  • (UK) /ˈkɒliˌwɒbl̩z/
noun: {{head}}
  1. (pluralonly, informal) Stomachache. {{defdate}}
    • 1823, Pierce Egan (editor), Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,: Collywobbles, the gripes.
    • 1895 [1894 September 10], , , Chapter XLIII, To My Dear Colvin, I know I have something else to say to you, but unfortunately I awoke this morning with collywobbles, and had to take a small dose of laudanum with the usual consequences of dry throat, intoxicated legs, partial madness and total imbecility; and for the life of me I cannot remember what it is.
    • 1897, , , Chapter 3, 'I deeply regret,' answered Liza, 'but my royal 'ighness 'as got the collywobbles.'
    • {{ante}} , , Chapter 1, serialised in between 1914-15, The prefect was there again and it was his voice that was saying that he was to get up, that Father Minister had said he was to get up and dress and go to the infirmary. And while he was dressing himself as quickly as he could the prefect said: — We must pack off to Brother Michael because we have the collywobbles!
    • 1917, , , Part III, Chapter V, "D'ye hear, Richard? Now's your chance," repeated Ned, not to be done. "A very different thing this, I can tell you, from running round dosing people for the collywobbles. I know men who are raising the splosh any way they can to get in."
  2. (pluralonly, informal) Anxiety, fear
Synonyms: (anxiety) have butterflies in one's stomach
Colonel Sanders etymology After , the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (slang) a restaurant.
color {{wikipedia}} {{ picdic }} Alternative forms: colour (British) (see the usage notes below) etymology From Middle English color, colour, from xno colur, from Old French colour, color, from Latin color, from Old Latin colos, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- 〈*ḱel-〉. Akin to Latin cēlō, Old English helan "to conceal, cover, hide"; see hele. Displaced Old English færbu, and Middle English blee, from Old English blēo. More at blee. Also partially replaced Old English hīw and its descendants, which is less often used in this sense. Compare Dutch kleur, Danish kulør, Swedish kulör. In the US, the spelling color is used to match the spelling of the word's Latin etymon{{,}} and to make all derivatives consistent (colorimeter, colorize, colorless, etc). Elsewhere in the English-speaking world, the spelling colour has been retained. pronunciation
  • (UK) {{enPR}}, /ˈkʌl.ə(ɹ)/
  • (US) {{enPR}}, /ˈkʌl.ɚ/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
noun: {{en-noun}} {{tcx}}
  1. (uncountable) The spectral composition of visible light Humans and birds can perceive color.
  2. (countable) A particular set of visible spectral compositions, perceived or named as a class. Most languages have names for the colors black, white, red, and green.
  3. (uncountable) Hue as opposed to achromatic colors (black, white and grays). He referred to the white flag as one "drained of all color".
  4. (uncountable) Human skin tone, especially as an indicator of race or ethnicity. Color has been a sensitive issue in many societies.
  5. (figuratively) Interest, especially in a selective area. a bit of local color
  6. (heraldry) Any of the standard dark tincture used in a coat of arms, including azure, gules, sable, and vert. Contrast with metal.
  7. (in the plural) A standard or banner. The loss of their colors destroyed the regiment's morale.
  8. The system of color television. This film is broadcast in color.
  9. (in the plural) An award for sporting achievement, particularly within a school or university. He was awarded colors for his football.
  10. In corporate finance, details on sales, profit margins, or other financial figures, especially while reviewing quarterly results when an officer of a company is speaking to investment analysts. Could you give me some color with regards to which products made up the mix of revenue for this quarter?
  11. (physics) A property of quark, with three values called red, green, and blue, which they can exchange by passing gluon.
  12. (typography) The relative lightness or darkness of a mass of written or printed text on a page.
  13. (snooker) Any of the colored balls excluding the red.
  14. A front or facade: an ostensible truth actually false.
    • {{rfex}}
  15. An appearance of right or authority. Under color of law, he managed to bilk taxpayers of millions of dollars.
  16. (medicine) Skin color noted as: normal, jaundice, cyanotic, flush, mottled, pale, or ashen as part of the skin signs assessment.
The late xno colour, which is the standard UK spelling, has been the usual spelling in Britain since the 14th century and was chosen by Samuel Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language (1755) along with other xno spellings such as favour, honour, etc. The Latin spelling color was occasionally used from the 15th century onward, mainly due to Latin influence; it was lemmatized by Noah Webster's Webster's Dictionary (1828), along with favor, honor, etc., and is currently the standard US spelling. In Canada, colour is preferred, but color is not unknown; in Australia, -our endings are the standard, although -or endings had some currency in the past and are still sporadically found in some regions. In New Zealand, -our endings are the standard. Synonyms: (spectral composition of visible light) blee, (particular set named as a class) blee, hue, (hue, as opposed to achromatic colours) hue, shade, blee, (human skin tone as an indicator of race or ethnicity) colour of one’s skin, complexion, blee, ethnicity, race, (interest, especially in a selective area) interest, (dark tincture) stain, (standard or banner) banner, standard, (colour television) colour television
adjective: {{en-adj}} (US)
  1. Conveying color, as opposed to shades of gray. Color television and movies were considered a great improvement over black and white.
verb: {{en-verb}} (US)
  1. To give something color. We could color the walls red.
  2. (intransitive) To apply colors to the areas within the boundaries of a line drawing using colored markers or crayons. My kindergartener loves to color.
  3. (of a face) To become red through increased blood flow. Her face colored as she realized her mistake.
  4. To affect without completely changing. That interpretation certainly colors my perception of the book.
  5. (informal) To attribute a quality to. Color me confused.
  6. (mathematics) To assign colors to the vertices of (a graph) or the region of (a map) so that no two adjacent ones have the same color. Can this graph be two-colored? You can color any map with four colors.
Synonyms: (give something color) dye, paint, stain, shade, tinge, tint, (apply colors within boundaries of a line drawing), (of a face, become red) blush, (affect without completely changing) affect, influence, (attribute a quality to) call
colored Alternative forms: coloured (British spelling) pronunciation
  • (US) {{enPR}}, /ˈkʌləɹd/
  • {{audio}}
adjective: {{en-adj}}
  1. Having a color. Wash colored items separately from whites and darks to prevent the colors from bleeding.
  2. Having a particular or kind of color. The room was colored red, with a dark-colored rug.
  3. Having prominent colors; colorful. The singer wore a colored shirt.
  4. Influenced pervasive but subtly. My opinions are colored by my upbringing.
  5. (US, now dated and potentially offensive) Of skin color other than the white; in particular: black. Being of an older generation, they considered themselves "colored ladies".
  6. (South Africa, potentially offensive) Of neither black nor white skin color. Most of the colored community speaks Afrikaans, whereas languages like Xhosa or Venda are typically spoken by blacks and English is spoken mostly by whites.
  7. (chiefly, historical) Designated for use by colored people (in either the US or South African sense). a colored drinking fountain; a colored hospital
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (US, now dated and offensive) A colored person.
  2. (laundry) A colored article of clothing.
verb: {{head}}
  1. en-past of color
colour {{wikipedia}} {{ picdic }} Alternative forms
  • color (US) (see the usage notes below)
etymology From Middle English color, colour, from xno colur, from Old French colour, color, from Latin color, from Old Latin colos, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- 〈*ḱel-〉. Akin to Latin cēlō, Old English helan "to conceal, cover, hide"; see hele. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English blēo. More at blee. Compare Dutch kleur, Danish kulør, Swedish kulör. In the US, the spelling color is used to match the spelling of the word's Latin etymon{{,}} and to make all derivatives consistent (colorimeter, colorize, colorless, etc). Elsewhere in the English-speaking world, the spelling colour has been retained. pronunciation
  • (UK) {{enPR}}, /ˈkʌl.ə(ɹ)/
  • (US) {{enPR}}, /ˈkʌl.ɚ/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
noun: {{en-noun}} {{tcx}}
  1. (uncountable) The spectral composition of visible light. exampleHumans and birds can perceive colour.
  2. (countable) A particular set of visible spectral compositions, perceived or named as a class. exampleMost languages have names for the colours black, white, red, and green.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, 5 , [http://openlibrary.org/works/OL1097634W The Mirror and the Lamp] , “Here, in the transept and choir, where the service was being held, one was conscious every moment of an increasing brightness; colours glowing vividly beneath the circular chandeliers, and the rows of small lights on the choristers' desks flashed and sparkled in front of the boys' faces, deep linen collars, and red neckbands.”
  3. (uncountable) Hue as opposed to achromatic colours (black, white and greys). exampleHe referred to the white flag as one "drained of all colour".
  4. (uncountable) Human skin tone, especially as an indicator of race or ethnicity. exampleColour has been a sensitive issue in many societies.
  5. (figuratively) Interest, especially in a selective area. examplea bit of local colour
    • {{RQ:Vance Nobody}} Three chairs of the steamer type, all maimed, comprised the furniture of this roof-garden, with (by way of local colour) on one of the copings a row of four red clay flower-pots filled with sun-baked dust{{nb...}}.
  6. (heraldry) Any of the standard dark tincture used in a coat of arms, including azure, gules, sable, and vert. Contrast with metal.
  7. (in the plural) A standard or banner. exampleThe loss of their colours destroyed the regiment's morale.
  8. The system of colour television. exampleThis film is broadcast in colour.
  9. (in the plural) An award for sporting achievement, particularly within a school or university. exampleHe was awarded colours for his football.
  10. In corporate finance, details on sales, profit margins, or other financial figures, especially while reviewing quarterly results when an officer of a company is speaking to investment analysts. exampleCould you give me some colour with regards to which products made up the mix of revenue for this quarter?
  11. (physics) A property of quark, with three values called red, green, and blue, which they can exchange by passing gluon.
  12. (typography) The relative lightness or darkness of a mass of written or printed text on a page.
  13. (snooker) Any of the coloured balls excluding the red.
  14. A front or façade: an ostensible truth actually false.
  15. An appearance of right or authority. exampleUnder colour of law, he managed to bilk taxpayers of millions of dollars.
  16. (medicine) Skin colour noted as: normal, jaundice, cyanotic, flush, mottled, pale, or ashen as part of the skin signs assessment.
The late xno colour, which is the standard UK spelling, has been the usual spelling in Britain since the 14th century and was chosen by Samuel Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language (1755) along with other xno spellings such as favour, honour, etc. The Latin spelling color was occasionally used from the 15th century onward, mainly due to Latin influence; it was lemmatized by Noah Webster's Webster's Dictionary (1828), along with favor, honor, etc., and is currently the standard US spelling. In Canada, colour is preferred, but color is not unknown; in Australia, -our endings are the standard, although -or endings had some currency in the past and are still sporadically found in some regions. In New Zealand, -our endings are the standard. Synonyms: (spectral composition of visible light) blee, (particular set named as a class) blee, hue, (hue, as opposed to achromatic colours) hue, shade, blee, (human skin tone as an indicator of race or ethnicity) colour of one’s skin, complexion, blee, ethnicity, race, (interest, especially in a selective area) interest, (dark tincture) stain, (standard or banner) banner, standard, (colour television) colour television
adjective: {{en-adj}} {{term-context}}
  1. Conveying colour, as opposed to shades of grey. Colour television and films were considered a great improvement over black and white.
verb: {{en-verb}} {{term-context}}
  1. To give something colour. We could colour the walls red.
  2. (intransitive) To apply colours to the areas within the boundaries of a line drawing using coloured markers or crayons. My kindergartener loves to colour.
  3. (of a face) To become red through increased blood flow. Her face coloured as she realised her mistake.
  4. To affect without completely changing. That interpretation certainly colours my perception of the book.
  5. (informal) To attribute a quality to. Colour me confused.
  6. (mathematics) To assign colours to the vertices of (a graph) or the region of (a map) so that no two adjacent ones have the same colour. Can this graph be two-coloured? You can colour any map with four colours.
Synonyms: (give something colour) dye, paint, stain, shade, tinge, tint, (apply colours within boundaries of a line drawing), (of a face, become red) blush, (affect without completely changing) affect, influence, (attribute a quality to) call
anagrams:
  • courol
combat boot
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A type of boot designed to be worn by soldiers during actual combat or combat training
Combine {{wikipedia}} etymology From combine, referring to the merger and purchase of various underground railway, tram and bus companies in London, combining them into one organisation. Originally applied to , since used for successor organisations. pronunciation
  • (UK) /ˈkɒm.baɪn/
proper noun: {{en-proper noun}}
  1. (colloquial) London Underground
combo {{wikipedia}}
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A small musical group. The jazz combo played nightly at the little restaurant.
  2. (slang) A combination. I need to open the safe but I forgot the combo. I order the low priced combo platter: a taco, a burrito and a chimichanga.
  3. (video games) An action composed of a sequence of simpler actions, especially a composite attack move in a fight game.
    • 2002, Andy Slaven, Video Game Bible, 1985-2002 Obviously, this is something not seen very often, with super flashy, combo-driven fighters dominating store shelves everywhere.
anagrams:
  • coomb
come {{slim-wikipedia}} etymology From Middle English comen, cumen, from Old English coman, cuman, from Proto-Germanic *kwemaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷem-, *gʷém-, *gʷem-ye-. {{rel-top}} Cognate from Proto-Germanic with Scots cum, Saterland Frisian kuume, Western Frisian komme, Low German kamen, Dutch komen, German kommen, Danish komme, Swedish komma, Icelandic koma. Cognate from PIE via Latin veniō with many Romance language terms (e.g., French venir, Portuguese vir, Spanish venir), Lithuanian gimti, with terms in Iranian languages (e.g. Avestan ), via Sanskrit गच्छति 〈gacchati〉 with many Indic language terms (e.g., Hindi गति 〈gati〉). Cognate to English basis, from PIE via Ancient Greek. {{rel-bottom}} pronunciation
  • (UK) /kʌm/, [kʰɐm], {{enPR}}
  • {{audio}}
  • (US) /kʌm/, [kʰʌm], {{enPR}}
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
  • {{homophones}}
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (intransitive) To move from further away to near to. exampleShe’ll be coming ’round the mountain when she comes〈She’ll be coming ’round the mountain when she comes…〉
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Look, who comes yonder?
    • Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892) I did not come to curse thee.
    1. To move towards the speaker. exampleI called the dog, but she wouldn't come. exampleStop dawdling and come here!
    2. To move towards the listener. exampleHold on, I'll come in a second. exampleYou should ask the doctor to come to your house.
    3. To move towards the object that is the of the sentence. exampleNo-one can find Bertie Wooster when his aunts come to visit. exampleHundreds of thousands of people come to Disneyland every year.
    4. (in subordinate clauses and gerunds) To move towards the or subject of the main clause. exampleKing Cnut couldn't stop the tide coming. exampleHe threw the boomerang, which came right back to him.
    5. To move towards an unstated agent. exampleThe butler should come when called.
  2. (intransitive) To arrive. exampleThe guests came at eight o'clock.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill (novelist) , The Celebrity, 5 , “Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. She stood for a moment holding her skirt above the grimy steps,…, and the light of the reflector fell full upon her.”
  3. (intransitive) To appear, to manifest itself. exampleThe pain in his leg comes and goes.
    • Samuel Butler (poet) (1613-1680), Hudibras when butter does refuse to come [i.e. to form]
  4. (intransitive) To take a position to something else in a sequence. exampleWhich letter comes before Y?   Winter comes after autumn.
  5. (intransitive, slang) To achieve orgasm; to cum. exampleHe came after a few minutes.
  6. (copulative, figuratively, with close) To approach a state of being or accomplishment. exampleThey came very close to leaving on time.   His test scores came close to perfect. exampleOne of the screws came loose, and the skateboard fell apart.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill (novelist) , The Celebrity, 3 , “Now all this was very fine, but not at all in keeping with the Celebrity's character as I had come to conceive it. The idea that adulation ever cloyed on him was ludicrous in itself. In fact I thought the whole story fishy, and came very near to saying so.”
  7. (figuratively, with to) To take a particular approach or point of view in regard to something. exampleHe came to SF literature a confirmed technophile, and nothing made him happier than to read a manuscript thick with imaginary gizmos and whatzits.
  8. (copulative, archaic) To become, to turn out to be. exampleHe was a dream come true.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616) How come you thus estranged?
  9. (intransitive) To be supplied, or made available; to exist. exampleHe's as tough as they come.   Our milkshakes come in vanilla, strawberry and chocolate flavours.
  10. (slang) To carry through; to succeed in. exampleYou can't come any tricks here.
  11. (intransitive) Happen. exampleThis kind of accident comes when you are careless.
    • {{quote-magazine}}
  12. (intransitive, with from or sometimes of) To have a social background.
    • 2011, Kate Gramich, Kate Roberts, University of Wales Press, ISBN 9780708323380, chapter 3, {{gbooks}}: While Kate Roberts came from a poor background and, later in life, in the post-Second World War period suffered from severe money shortages, in the early 1930s, she and her husband must have counted themselves relatively well off, particularly in comparison with their neighbours in Tonypandy.
    1. To be or have been a resident or native. exampleWhere did you come from?
    2. To have been brought up by or employed by. exampleShe comes from a good family. exampleHe comes from a disreputable legal firm.
  13. (intransitive, of grain) To germinate.
In its general sense, come specifically marks motion towards the (whether explicitly stated or not). Its counterpart, usually referring to motion away from or not involving the deictic centre, is go. For example, the sentence "Come to the tree" implies contextually that the speaker is already at the tree - "Go to the tree" often implies that the speaker is elsewhere. Either the speaker or the listener can be the deictic centre - the sentences "I will go to you" and "I will come to you" are both valid, depending on the exact nuances of the context. When there is no clear speaker or listener, the deictic centre is usually the focus of the sentence or the topic of the piece of writing. "Millions of people came to America from Europe" would be used in an article about America, but "Millions of people went to America from Europe" would be used in an article about Europe. When used with adverbs of location, come is usually paired with here or hither. In interrogatives, come usually indicates a question about source - "Where are you coming from?" - while go indicates a question about destination - "Where are you going?" or "Where are you going to?" A few old texts use comen as the past participle. The phrase "dream come true" is a set phrase; the verb "come" in the sense "become" is archaic outside of that set phrase and the collocation "come about". The collocations “come with” and “come along” mean accompany, used as “Do you want to come with me?” and “Do you want to come along?” In the Midwestern American dialect, “come with” can occur without a following object, as in “Do you want to come with?” In this dialect, “with” can also be used in this way with some other verbs, such as “take with”. Examples of this may be found in plays by Chicagoan David Mamet, such as American Buffalo.[http://positiveanymore.blogspot.com/2006/04/chicago-dialect.html Chicago Dialect] This objectless use is not permissible in other dialects.
antonyms:
  • leave, go
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (obsolete) Coming, arrival; approach.
    • 1869, RD Blackmoore, Lorna Doone, II: “If we count three before the come of thee, thwacked thou art, and must go to the women.”
  2. (slang) Semen, or female ejaculatory discharge.
preposition: {{en-prep}}
  1. en Leave it to settle for about three months and, come Christmas time, you'll have a delicious concoctions to offer your guests. Come retirement, their Social Security may turn out to be a lot less than they counted on.
    • {{quote-news}} Come the final whistle, Mikel Arteta lay flabbergasted on the turf.
  • Came is often used when both the indicated event, period or change in state occurred in the past.
interjection: {{en-interj}}
  1. An exclamation to express annoyance. exampleCome come! Stop crying.  Come now! You must eat it.
  2. An exclamation to express encouragement, or to precede a request. exampleCome come! You can do it.  Come now! It won't bite you.
    • {{RQ:Frgsn Zlnstn}} “I'm through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come, let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
statistics:
  • {{rank}}
come again
etymology 1 Possibly an ellipsis of "Could you come again with what you just said?" "Come again with what you just said."
verb: {{head}}
  1. (idiomatic, informal) Could you repeat that? Repeat that please. a polite formula used when one has not heard or understood what has been said
    • 1955, , "When a Man Murders...", in , October 1994 edition, ISBN 0553249592, page 120: "Who says he did?" / "Aubry." / "Yeah? A guy in for murder? Come again." / "Glad to. Beebe says so too."
Synonyms: excuse me (especially US), I beg your pardon (formal), pardon, sorry, what, say again
etymology 2 An ellipsis of "Please come back for another visit"
verb: {{head}}
  1. (idiomatic) Used as a polite farewell to a visitor, inviting a return visit.
  • Often used in retail stores and service establishments, especially in hotels and restaurants
anagrams:
  • egomaniac
come-all-ye etymology As come-all-you, with Hiberno-English second-person plural pronoun ye.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. (Ireland, sometimes, pejorative) A come-all-you; a popular Irish ballad.
quotations:
  • {{seeCites}}

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