The Alternative Dutch Dictionary

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Colourful extracts from Wiktionary. Slang, vulgarities, profanities, slurs, interjections, colloquialisms and more.

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40 fikt etymology Beverages that hold an alcoholpercentage of 40% are able to be put on fire for a short while, unlike the stronger beverages. Hence, 40% is "the" minimum.
phrase: {{head}}
  1. (slang) [It] will be the minimal effort.
aanpappen etymology From aan + pappen pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (informal) to get in touch
anagrams:
  • pappen aan
achenebbisj {{wikipedia}} etymology From Yiddish נעביש 〈nʻbyş〉. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
adjective: {{nl-adj}}
  1. (informal) shabby.
afranselen etymology From af + ranselen. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (informal) to beat (someone) up
related terms:
  • afranseling
  • ransel
aftaaien pronunciation
  • /ˈɑfˌtaːj.ə(n)/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (rare) to stop
  2. (informal) to go away
Synonyms: opdonderen, oprotten (stronger than "aftaaien"), opsodemieteren (much stronger than "aftaaien")
aftrekken etymology From af + trekken. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. to pull off
  2. (arithmetic) to subtract
  3. (slang) to masturbate
antonyms:
  • optellen
anagrams:
  • trekken af
aju Alternative forms: ajuus etymology From French adieu
interjection: {{nl-interj}}
  1. (informal) bye, see you
ajuus Alternative forms: aju etymology From French adieu
interjection: {{nl-interj}}
  1. (informal) bye, see you
alles goed
phrase: {{nl-phrase}}
  1. (informal) how are you? (literally: everything good?)
Synonyms: hoe is het?
atten etymology {{rfe}} Conceivably a phonetic spelling from the first part of ad fundum (from Latin 'to the bottom') + -en to make it a verb. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (slang) To empty a glass by drinking it in 1 draught; to down
anagrams:
  • natte, tante
baat pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
  • {{audio}}
etymology 1 From Middle Dutch bate, from odt *bato, from Proto-Germanic *batô.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. profit, advantage
related terms:
  • baten
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of baten
  2. nl-verb form of baten
etymology 2
adjective: {{nl-adj}}
  1. (slang) cocky
bagger pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. dredge
  2. filth, muck, any mucky or dirty substance (such as dredge)
adjective: {{nl-adj}}
  1. (slang) crap, terrible, bleh Het weer is bagger vandaag. The weather is crap today.
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of baggeren
  2. nl-verb form of baggeren
bahasa etymology From Indonesian bahasa, from Sanskrit भाषा 〈bhāṣā〉.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (slang) Indonesian language. Mostly used by Dutch-speaking Indonesians.
bajes etymology Borrowed from Yiddish בית 〈byţ〉, which is borrowed from Hebrew בית 〈byţ〉. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (Netherlands, informal) slammer, jail, prison
Synonyms: gevangenis
bal pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
  • /bɑl/
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. a ball or any object with such a shape
  2. (informal) testicle, nut
  3. (sports) pass, shot Lekker balletje! - Nice pass/shot!
{{nl-noun}}
  1. ball, dance party
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of ballen
  2. nl-verb form of ballen
balen pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
  • /ˈbaːlə(n)/
etymology From bale, from French balle.
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (intransitive) To be annoyed, frustrated or fed up
  2. (intransitive) To act up, usually from frustration
interjection: {{nl-interj}}
  1. (informal) too bad, that sucks
noun: {{head}}
  1. nl-noun form of pl
ballen pronunciation
  • /ˈbɑ.lə(n)/
  • {{audio}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. to play with a ball
  2. to form into a ball or similar shape; to clasp, clench (into a fist)
  3. (vulgar) To fuck
noun: {{head}}
  1. nl-noun form of pl
batsen pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. To rock, to bounce
  2. To hit, to slap
  3. (colloquial) To fuck
beer pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
  • /beːr/
  • {{audio}}
etymology 1 From odt *bero, from Proto-Germanic *berô. Compare Western Frisian bear, English bear, German Bär, Danish bjørn.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. bear (large predatory mammal of the family Ursidae)
  2. (metaphor) person who is physically impressive and/or crude Wat een beer van een vent daar voorin, he? What a bear of a guy there in front, huh?
  3. (student slang) debt, credit
etymology 2 From odt *bēr, from Proto-Germanic *baizaz. Cognate with English boar.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. boar (male porcine)
  2. protective external construction, notably against ice or supporting the weight of the main
etymology 3 {{rfe}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. manure (excrement gathered in a pit to fertilize)
bef pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
etymology 1 From Middle Dutch beffe, of unclear origin, neither Germanic nor Romance theories being plausible.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (archaic) collar
  2. An ornamental pair of band worn hanging onto the chest, notably as part of formal dress by certain Catholic and protestant clergy, magistrates and professors
  3. By analogy, certain other objects
  4. Patch on the throat or chest of a different color on cats or dogs
  5. (slang) The female genitalia
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of beffen
  2. nl-verb form of beffen
etymology 2
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. A nickname for an unspecified small Dutch coin
beffen
etymology 1
noun: {{head}}
  1. nl-noun form of pl
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (transitive) To put on a 'bef' (ornamental bands or collar) on (someone's formal dress); often reflexive: zich beffen.
  2. (intransitive) To wear such a 'bef'; hence, to look smart(ly dressed).
  3. (transitive, colloquial) To sensually stimulate the vagina physically, as by licking.
related terms:
  • beffendracht {{g2}}
etymology 2
noun: {{head}}
  1. nl-noun form of pl
etymology 3 An alternative form of baffen, compare blaffen.
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (transitive) To yap, yelp, bark sharply like a small dog.
Synonyms: keffen
befrekel etymology bef '(clerical) ornamental bands' (from Middle Dutch beffe 'cap, collar', of unclear origin) + rekel 'cur, rascal'
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (derogatory) A sanctimonious priest
related terms:
  • befkraag
  • gebeft
  • priesterbef
  • rekelachtig
  • rekels
bek pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. a bird's beak
  2. any animal's mouth (such as a snout)
  3. (informal) a human mouth Hou je bek!: Shut your mouth! op je bek gaan: (informal) to fall, to trip over (so that fall is face-down)
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of bekken
  2. nl-verb form of bekken
bekken pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
etymology 1
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. basin, broad-shaped liquid container
  2. (geography) basin, geological depression
  3. (anatomy) pelvis, basin-shaped body region
  4. (music) cymbal, two-part metallic percussion instrument
etymology 2 from bek 'beak, bill, mouth, snout'
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (literally) peck (at a target), hit by bill
  2. (metaphore; rare) snap, sneer (at someone)
  3. (colloquial) sound, 'feel' in the mouth when sung or spoken
related terms:
  • bekkentrekken
  • bekkesnijden, bekkesnijder {{g2}}
  • Elke vogel zingt zoals hij gebekt is
noun: {{head}}
  1. nl-noun form of pl
benenwagen etymology From benen ‘legs’ + wagen ‘car, cart’, as if the legs were a "vehicle". pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (mildly, humorous) shanks' pony; the feet or legs as a form of transport
ben je allergisch voor medicijnen {{phrasebook}} Alternative forms: bent u allergisch voor medicijnen? (formal) pronunciation
  • [bɛn jə ɑˈlɛrɣis vʊːr meːdiˈsɛi̯nə(n)]
phrase: {{nl-phrase}}
  1. (informal) are you allergic to any medications?
bent u allergisch voor medicijnen {{phrasebook}} Alternative forms: ben je allergisch voor medicijnen? (informal) pronunciation
  • [bɛnt y ɑˈlɛrɣis vʊːr meːdiˈsɛi̯nə(n)]
phrase: {{nl-phrase}}
  1. (formal) are you allergic to any medications?
bi etymology From biseksueel. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
adjective: {{nl-adj}}
  1. (colloquial) bisexual
bikken pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. to chip, chip off
  2. (colloquial) to eat
Synonyms: eten, kanen
blauwe
adjective: {{nl-adj-form}}
  1. nl-adj form of infl
etymology From the apparent blue colour of the gum of Indonesian people. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun-adj}}
  1. (vulgar) Indo (very offensive)
blauwe maandag
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (colloquial) short period of time
bloedgeil pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
adjective: {{nl-adj}}
  1. (slang) horny as hell, pointedly sexually aroused
boer pronunciation
  • /ˈbuːr/
  • {{audio}}
etymology 1 From {{etym}} bure, from Proto-Germanic *būraz, thus originally the same as modern buur. The form boer is that of many eastern dialects including {{etym}}, where Germanic -ū- has been retained as a back vowel. In early modern Dutch these two dialectal forms were adopted as semantically distinguished words. Cognate to Old English būr, ġebūr (whence English bower) and Old High German būr (whence German Bauer).
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (male) farmer, peasant
  2. -boer (in compounds) merchant (and sometimes producer) of a certain product group, mainly foods, often named after it, e.g. melkboer 'milkman', groenteboer '(male) greengrocer'
  3. A boor, yokel, ruffian
  4. (slang) A jack (playing cards)
Synonyms: (farmer) landbouwer, teler, tuinder, veehouder
etymology 2 Originally onomatopoetic, as is English burp. The perception of farmers (etymology 1) as being mannerless people has probably played a secondary role, too. The same in German Bäuerchen.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. A burp
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of boeren
  2. nl-verb form of boeren
anagrams:
  • bore, ober
bonje pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (informal) bickering, quarrel
Synonyms: ruzie
boomslang etymology boom + slang pronunciation
  • (NL) /ˈbom.slɑŋ/
  • (BE) /ˈbom.slɑŋ/
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. A boomslang.
borie etymology From Sranan Tongo.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (slang) cocaine, crack
botje pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun-dim}}
  1. nl-noun form of dim
  2. (colloquial, Netherlands) A boner, euphemism for an erected phallus
Synonyms: (diminutive for a bone) beentje {{g2}}, (euphemisms for an erect phallus) paal, stijve {{g2}}
bout etymology From Middle Dutch bout, from odt *bolt, from Proto-Germanic *bultaz. Compare German Bolzen, West Frisian bout, English bolt, Danish bolt, Icelandic bolti. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. bolt
  2. leg of an animal as food
  3. (vulgar) fart
Synonyms: poot, scheet, ruft
related terms:
  • moer
  • schroef
brak pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
  • {{audio}}
adjective: {{nl-adj}}
  1. brackish
  2. (colloquial) bad
  3. (colloquial) hung over
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of breken
anagrams:
  • bark, krab
brandhout etymology From brand + hout. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. firewood exampleHet halve bos is gekapt voor'' brandhout. Half the forest has been cut down for firewood.
  2. (colloquial) something of very low quality exampleDeze auto is compleet'' brandhout. This car is total rubbish.
brilslang etymology From bril ‘spectacles, glasses’ + slang ‘snake’, on account of the resemblance with the shape of the black marking on its collar. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. cobra
Synonyms: cobra
broekschijter etymology From broek ‘trousers’ + schijter ‘one one poops’ pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (literally) a child which isn't quite potty-trained
  2. (derogatory) a coward Bart is een echte broekschijter: pa moet nog maar met de riem dreigen of hij doet al in z'n broek Bart is a real scardy-pants: pa only has to threaten with the belt and he shits in his pants
Synonyms: (coward) platbroek, schijthuis {{g2}}, schijtlaars, schijtlijster, schrikschijter {{g2}}
brompot pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (informal) Grump (usually male). Na de dood van zijn vrouw werd hij een vreselijke brompot. He became a terrible grump after his wife died.
bruin pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
  • /brœy̯n/
  • {{audio}}
adjective: {{nl-adj}}
  1. having a brown colour (as chocolate, for example)
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. the color brown Het bruin van de stam contrasteerde fel met het groen van de bladeren - The brown color of the trunk contrasted sharply with the green color of the leafs.
{{nl-noun}}
  1. (slang) heroin Mijn god, zit ie aan de bruin? - My god, is he on heroin?
The expression aan de bruin zijn is used for the addiction to heroin only, not for individual shots.
bubbels pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{head}}
  1. nl-noun form of pl
  2. (slang) champagne
buis pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. pipe, duct
  2. (slang) television
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of buizen
  2. nl-verb form of buizen
chateau migraine {{was fwotd}} Alternative forms: château migraine etymology The term 'chateau' is used in imitation of the many French wines named after a château, with migraine added for humorous effect, as it is itself a French loanword and seems like a plausible name for a wine if not for its actual meaning. pronunciation
  • /ʃɑˌtoː miˈɡrɛːnə/
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (humorous) cheap or poor quality wine, said to give one a headache
    • 2013, M. Blum, L.F. Kaiser, Trouwen voor Dummies, Pearson Education, page 142: Afhankelijk van het huis kan dit een prima wijntje zijn of chateau migraine. Depending on the house, this can be a perfectly good wine or a chateau migraine.
col
etymology 1 From French col, from Latin collum.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (informal, Belgium) (clothing) collar
Synonyms: kraag
etymology 2
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (informal, Belgium) (sports) mountain pass
Synonyms: bergpas
etymology 3 From French colle
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (informal, Belgium) glue
Synonyms: lijm
crème
alternative spellings:
  • (colloquial) kreem
pronunciation
  • /krɛm/, /krɛːm/
  • {{audio}}
etymology Borrowing from French crème.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. cream (color)
  2. (colloquial) ice cream
  3. cream (medicament)
{{catlangcode}}
cupcakemama
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (slang) yummy mummy
dakje pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun-dim}}
  1. nl-noun form of dim
  2. (informal) A circumflex diacritic
dankje pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
interjection: {{nl-interj}}
  1. (colloquial) alternative spelling of dank je
de groeten pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
interjection: {{nl-interj}}
  1. (colloquial) no way, screw that, yeah right Zou je me duizend euro willen lenen?Ja, de groeten! Could I borrow a thousand euros? — Yeah right, no way!
dialect etymology From Middle French dialecte, from Latin dialectos, dialectus, from Ancient Greek διάλεκτος 〈diálektos〉, from διαλέγομαι 〈dialégomai〉, from διά 〈diá〉 + λέγω 〈légō〉. pronunciation
  • /ˌdijaːˈlɛkt/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. dialect
  2. slang
Synonyms: (dialect) streektaal, mondaard
anagram:
  • citadel
dierlijk etymology dier 'animal' + -lijk '-ly' compare German tierlich pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
adjective: {{nl-adj}}
  1. (literally) animal -, relating to fauna
  2. made of animal(s) (parts), such as furs and edible species
  3. (pejorative) beastly, subhuman etc.
  4. (figuratively) instinctive, primitive
Synonyms: beestig, beestachtig
antonyms:
  • menselijk human(e)
  • plantaardig vegetal
dikzak etymology Equivalent to dik ‘thick, fat’ + zak ‘sack, bag’. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (derogatory) fatass
dimmen etymology From English dim. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. to dim, to make darker (especially a light)
  2. (colloquial) to tone down oneself, to pipe down, to be quiet
Synonyms: (to dim) verduisteren, afblinden
doerak etymology From Russian дурак. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (colloquial) rascal
anagrams:
  • rokade
donder etymology From Middle Dutch donre, donner, donder, from odt *thunar, *thonar, from Proto-Germanic *þunraz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tenh₂- 〈*(s)tenh₂-〉. Compare German Donner, West Frisian tonger, English thunder. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. thunder
  2. (informal) the head or body Kees kreeg van zijn vader een klap op zijn donder. Kees got a clout against the head from his father.
  3. (informal) a thing (as in not a single thing) Wat je nu doet haalt geen donder uit! What you're doing right now isn't achieving a thing!
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of donderen
  2. nl-verb form of donderen
dood pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
  • /doːt/
  • {{audio}}
etymology 1 From Middle Dutch doot, doet, from odt dōt, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz. Compare West Frisian dead, German tot, English dead, Danish død.
adjective: {{nl-adj}}
  1. dead
related terms:
  • dode {{g2}}, {{g2}}
  • doden
  • dooddoener {{g2}}
  • monddood
adverb: {{nl-adv}}
  1. (colloquial) Flemish A lot.
etymology 2 From Middle Dutch doot, doet, from odt dōth, dōt, from Proto-Germanic *dauþuz. Compare West Frisian dead, German Tod, English death, Danish død.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. death
etymology 3 From doden.
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of doden
  2. nl-verb form of doden
anagrams:
  • dodo
doos pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
  • /doːs/
etymology From Middle Dutch dose (since 1361), probably from Latin dosis.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. box
  2. (vulgar) vagina
  3. (vulgar) stupid female.
doppen pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{head}}
  1. nl-noun form of pl
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. to pod (remove beans or peas from their pods)
  2. (colloquial) To fuck
dorpsgek etymology From dorp ‘village’ + gek ‘crazy person’. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (somewhat, offensive) village idiot
dot pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. cutie, something small and adorable
  2. darling, sweetie (almost always used in its diminutive form - dotje)
  3. (informal) a lot, a large amount een dot geld - a lot of money
  4. a swab
Synonyms: (cutie) kleintje, (darling) schatje, liefje
douwen pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (informal) alternative form of duwen
draad etymology From Middle Dutch draet, from odt *thrād, from Proto-Germanic *þrēduz, from Proto-Indo-European *treh₁-tu- 〈*treh₁-tu-〉, from *terh₁- 〈*terh₁-〉. Compare German Draht, West Frisian tried, English thread, Danish tråd. pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. thread
  2. wire
  3. (engineering) screw thread
  4. (Internet, informal) discussion thread, topic
Synonyms: (screw thread) schroefdraad
descendants:
  • Afrikaans: draad
draaikont pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (informal) A twister; an inconsistent person, who changes his position to please everyone. (Literally: ass-turner).
  2. (informal) A fidget; someone who can't sit still.
eikel etymology From Middle Dutch ecle, ekele, from odt *ēkila, *eikila, from Proto-Germanic *aikilǭ. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. acorn
  2. (anatomy) glans penis
  3. (slang) jerk, dickhead
ekkies
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (slang) money Maak die ekkies over. - Transfer that money.
Used predominantly by students and has no singular.
elco etymology {{blend}}.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (electronics, informal) electrolytic capacitor
Synonyms: elektrolytische condensator
emmeren pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (informal) to whine, to worry
enfin Alternative forms: (informal) afijn, affijn etymology From French enfin. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
adverb: {{nl-adv}}
  1. finally; “in the end”; implies that a summary of something will follow
Engelse ziekte {{wikipedia}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (idiomatic, pejorative) writing compound word with a space separating the two parts (as is common in English, i.e. wall paint), rather than joined as a single word (as is usual in Dutch, i.e. muurverf) (lit.: English disease)
es
etymology 1 From Proto-Germanic *askaz, *askiz (compare Western Frisian esk, English ash, German Esche, Danish ask), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃osk- 〈*h₃osk-〉 (compare Welsh onnen, Latin ornus, Lithuanian úosis, Russian ясень 〈âsenʹ〉, Albanian ah, Ancient Greek ὀξύα 〈oxýa〉, xcl հացի 〈hacʻi〉). pronunciation
  • /ɛs/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. ash, ash tree
etymology 2
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (music) E-flat
etymology 3 pronunciation
  • /əs/
adverb: {{nl-adv}}
  1. (informal, dialectal) Elision of eens Kom es hierKom eens hier — Come over here (for a second).
esculaap etymology From Esculaap, the Greco-Roman god of healing, from Latin Aesculapius, from Ancient Greek (Asklepios); cognate with French esculape pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (colloquial) A physician, medical doctor
Synonyms: arts {{g2}}, doctor (in de medicijnen/geneeskunde) {{g2}}, dokter {{g2}}, geneesheer {{g2}}
eurie
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (informal) The euro (currency)
  2. (informal) Plural form of euro (a coin of that currency)
ff
etymology 1 Abbreviation of Latin folio, ablative of folium.
abbreviation: {{rfc-header}} {{head}}
  1. ff.
etymology 2 When pronounced as the plural of 'f', it sounds like the Dutch word effen.
abbreviation: {{rfc-header}} {{head}}
  1. (informal) abbreviation of effen; briefly, just.
This abbreviation is primarily used in informal communication, such as text messaging and web messaging.
fikken pronunciation
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verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (slang) To burn.
Synonyms: branden
noun: {{head}}
  1. nl-noun form of pl
  2. (slang) hand
flap pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. flap something flexible that is loose
  2. (colloquial) banknote
flappentap etymology From flap ‘banknote’ + tap ‘tap’. pronunciation
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noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (colloquial) automated teller machine
Synonyms: bankomaat, geldautomaat
related terms:
  • flappen tappen
flappen tappen
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (colloquial) to withdraw cash
related terms:
  • flappentap
flens
etymology 1 gem, cognate with flansen.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. A smack, blow, especially on the ear
  2. (usually in the diminutive: flensje) A small, flat pancake
  3. (rare) A small (loin)cloth
  4. (slang) (etymology uncertain) milk
interjection: {{nl-interj}}
  1. An exclamation to express hitting or throwing
etymology 2 From English flange
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. A flange, rim or collar on a metal object
  2. The flattened end of a metal bar, to be fixed on a surface
flik pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (slang) police officer
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of flikken
  2. nl-verb form of flikken
flikken pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (colloquial) to do, to pull off
noun: {{head}}
  1. nl-noun form of pl
flikker etymology {{rfe}} pronunciation
  • /ˈflɪ.kər/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. A mender, fixer, someone who mends or fixes
  2. A jump while clicking the heel
  3. A human body, especially when in the nude
  4. (Netherlands) A bit Maakt me geen flikker uit. I don’t care a bit.
  5. (slang, contemptuous, pejorative) A homosexual male; a queer.
Synonyms: (mender) fikser {{g2}}, reparateur, (human body) lijf {{g2}}, (bit) moer, zier, (homosexual) homo, jeanet
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of flikkeren
  2. nl-verb form of flikkeren
flikkeren pronunciation
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verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. to flicker, waver unsteadily
  2. (slang) to fall
flikker op pronunciation
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interjection: {{nl-interj}}
  1. (vulgar, slang) bugger off
fluit {{wikipedia}} pronunciation
  • {{rhymes}}
  • /flœy̯t/
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (musical instruments) flute or the sound it creates
  2. a whistle
  3. organ pipe
  4. (colloquial) penis
  5. shortened form of certain compounds, notably fluitglas, fluitschip
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of fluiten
  2. nl-verb form of fluiten
fretten
etymology 1 Doublet with vreten, from odt *fretan, from Proto-Germanic *fraetaną. Corresponds to ver + eten. Possibly influenced by German fressen.
noun: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (informal) to eat
etymology 2
noun: {{head}}
  1. nl-noun form of pl
frik pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (dated, pejorative) a narrow-minded and prejudiced schoolteacher
related terms:
  • schoolmeester, onderwijzer
fuckhoofd etymology From English fuck + Dutch hoofd. pronunciation
  • /ˈfɑkˌɦoːft/
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) fuckhead
gaai pronunciation
  • /ˈɣaːi̯/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
etymology 1 From Old French gai (like English jay), from ll gaius, plausibly echoic and supposedly influenced by the Roman common given name Gaius (=Caius, which in turn has been hypothetically derived from gaudeo or from gaius, while the French may well derive from gai, itself of gem origin.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (zoology) The jaybird, {{taxlink}}, a woodland corvine species
Synonyms: Vlaamse gaai (literally 'Flemish jay')
etymology 2 A parallel form of papagaai, by popular etymology confused with etymology 1, but actually from Middle Dutch papagoie, papegoie, from Arabic بَبّغَاء 〈bab̃gẖāʾ〉 and Persian بپغا 〈bpgẖạ〉, of uncertain origin.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. A wooden, somewhat bird-shaped target, often ornamented with bright plumes, used in archery competitions
  2. The high wooden stake or tower the above is mounted on
Synonyms: (wooden base) wip, schutsboom {{g2}}
etymology 3 gem, a parallel form of gade (cognate with German Gatte).
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (uncommon) A female spouse, notably (and mostly used in the diminutive):
    1. a female bird
    2. a female fish
    3. (humorous) a human mistress or wife
Synonyms: (animals) wijfje {{g2}}
gannef etymology From Yiddish גנבֿ 〈gnb̄〉. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (informal) thief
related terms:
  • gappen
gappen etymology From Yiddish. pronunciation
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verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (informal) to steal
gassen pronunciation
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verb: {{nl-verb}}
  1. (colloquial) to hit the gas, to accelerate a motor vehicle
  2. (colloquial) to drive wildly and at high speed
Synonyms: (accelerate) gas geven
noun: {{head}}
  1. nl-noun form of pl
gast pronunciation
  • /ɣɑst/, /xɑst/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
etymology 1 From odt *gast, from Proto-Germanic *gastiz.
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. guest
  2. (chiefly, in combinations) knave, worker, apprentice, delivery boy
  3. (colloquial) dude, chap
Synonyms: genodigde
antonyms:
  • (guest) gastheer
  • (apprentice) meester, stagemeester
etymology 2
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of gassen
  2. nl-verb form of gassen
gat etymology From Middle Dutch gat, from odt *gat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. A gap, hole
  2. A godforsaken place, hamlet
  3. (vulgar) An arsehole
  4. (archaic) A port
Synonyms: (hole) hol, opening, (godforsaken place) uithoek, midden van nergens
gatlikker etymology From gat ‘hole, arse’ + likker ‘licker’. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (vulgar) sycophant, arse-kisser, shameless or even slavish flatterer
Synonyms: kontlikker
gebroed etymology Germanic: ge- + the root of broeden 'to brood, incubate' pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. brood, hatch, spawn
  2. hatched offspring
  3. (humorous) children, youth in general
  4. (pejorative) riffraff, motley of people, scum Zelfs de politie waagt zich nooit ongewapend tussen het gebroed in dat getto Even the police never ventures unarmed among that ghetto scum. Straks verdrinken de inlanders in het gebroed der immigranten! Soon the natives will drown in immigrant spawn!
Synonyms: (hatching brood) broedsel {{g2}}, (riffraff) gespuis {{g2}}
participle: {{nl-past-ptc}}
  1. nl-verb form of broeden
anagrams:
  • bedroeg, bedroge, geboerd
gedacht pronunciation
  • /ɣə.ˈdɑxt/
  • (BE) [ʝə.ˈdɑçt]
  • {{audio}}
  • (NL) [ɣə.ˈdɑxt]
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{nl-noun}}
  1. (colloquial, Belgium) opinion
verb: {{nl-verb-form}}
  1. nl-verb form of gedenken
participle: {{nl-past-ptc}}
  1. nl-verb form of denken
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